12

Freight and Fleet

12.1   Overview of Services

 

This section covers broad areas concerning the use of standards for freight and fleet management including freight and fleet operations, communications, and monitoring, in deployment contexts that range from global long-distance freight movements, through urban logistics to last mile deliveries, with the monitoring and regulatory reporting regimes these entail.  Although these may often be considered in conjunction with the carriage of freight (cargo) there are of course instances of fleet management that may concern passenger transport (taxis, coaches, private hire services, etc.) as well.

 

 

Within Europe, freight movements and carriage are essential elements of our daily lives.  The food we eat, the clothes we wear, almost all packaged products, the fuel that powers hydrocarbon powered vehicles, supplies for factories, offices and businesses is moved from its point of origin to points of sale and use.  Increasingly many products are delivered direct to our door.

 

 

Urban Administrations have targets and policies to make the urban environment sustainable and clean, a healthy environment, and improve liveability. This is often done, in combination with other measures and restrictions, through measures that seek to constrain or control, such as low emission zones, bans on larger vehicles, and restrictions on the hours for freight deliveries.  At the same time, freight deliveries provide an essential life blood to maintain and develop the local economy, and provide services and commodities that the local citizens demand.

 

 

Freight and fleet interactions and transactions have a wide set of perspectives that can be applied to them, including commercial, contractual, regulation compliance, taxation, customs and as such standards relating to the transport of freight are a part of a much broader landscape, of both processes and supporting standards.  The functional areas and related standards mentioned in the section below are necessarily focussed on the transport elements of freight and fleet operations, and in particular road freight transport.

 

 

 

12.2    Stakeholders/Actors

12.2.1   Context

 

There are a large number of actors that have interest in various elements of freight and fleet management in part due to the range of different operational models and oversight.  In general, regulations affecting the movement of freight and fleet operations are defined at a national (or regional) level. The following subsections provide a description of the most significant stakeholders, in what can sometimes be very complex operational scenarios.

 

 

12.2.2    Consignor/Shipper

 

The party which, by contract with a carrier, consigns or sends goods with a carrier.

 

 

 

12.2.3    Consignee/Receiver

 

The person entitled to take delivery of the goods; person or company to whom goods are shipped.

 

 

 

12.2.4   Customer, ultimate consignee

 

The individual or entity purchasing goods or services.

 

 

 

12.2.5    Customs organizations

 

Government organization that deals with the levying of duties and taxes on imported goods from foreign countries and the control over the export and import of goods (ISO 24533).

 

 

12.2.6     Dispatchers / schedulers

 

Entities focussed on the optimisation and best use of the fleet resource. Monitoring route conditions, typically with good geographic understanding, maximising the crew's routes, a good understanding of driving hours and working time directive/driver hours constraints to ensure, load delivery within time constraints and for the drivers and vehicles to stay compliant.

 

 

 

 

12.2.7    Driver

 

Freight or fleet vehicle drivers.

 

 

 

 

12.2.8    Emergency responders

 

Emergency agencies and first responders, particularly in response to incidents and emergencies, in respect of freight movements especially when involving incidents known or expected to involve loads containing hazardous or dangerous goods.

 

 

 

 

 

12.2.9    Enforcement authorities, agencies and their officers

 

The law enforcement agency or organisation which is a statutory body existing within a jurisdiction and a specific area of responsibility that administers legislation to regulate, monitors and potentially undertakes enforcement compliance with existing legislation.  Within the domain of freight and fleet this is likely to encompass regulations covering the transportation of goods, vehicle licencing, operating permits and registration, vehicle safety inspectorates, and revenue collection agencies.   

 

 

 

12.2.10    Fleet owners/managers/operators

 

Fleet operators manage and control maintenance and operation of a fleet of vehicles. In the context of this section this should include fleets of vehicles used to carry freight, but also other forms of vehicle fleets such as taxis, private hire vehicles, buses.

 

 

 

 

12.2.11    Freight carrier

 

A person or organisation, which owns and/or operates a transport means, engaged in the transportation of passengers or property (goods, freight) by land, rail, air or water (Carrier, ISO 24533).

 

 

12.2.12   Freight consolidator

 

A person or organization engaged in the process of combining more than one consignment loaded in a container destined to one or more consignees, combining carload or truckload consignments to make carload or truckload movements (ISO 24533).

 

 

 

 

12.2.13    Freight forwarder

 

Freight forwarding is a service industry that involves moving goods around the world on behalf of importers and exporters. Freight forwarders specialise in moving cargo. They also arrange customs clearance of goods, maintain all documentation, oversee cargo packing and will at times deal with the movement of dangerous goods. They sign the contract of carriage with the carriers and then they find actual carriers to perform the transportation. They do not necessarily own their own means of transportation. (for sea transport see Hamburg Rules)

 

 

Note: the carriage of passengers brings these services close to the realm and the purview of standards for Public Transport operations (see section 17 {public transport}).

 

 

 

 

12.2.14    Infrastructure owners (bridges, rail crossings, tunnels)

 

A transport infrastructure owner interested in maintaining the integrity of the transport network and maintaining the value of the infrastructure assets, with measures to minimise risk to network users and the network asset.  Transport infrastructure owner typically seek to balance the needs of different users.

 

 

 

 

12.2.15    Intermodal hub managers/operators

 

An organization operating, managing and potentially owning facilities that are used for the transfer and potential storage of freight and cargo between freight vehicles and potentially between modes of transport.

 

 

 

 

12.2.16     Loading bay controllers

 

Entities responsible for control of access and use of loading/unloading bays and docks.

 

 

 

 

12.2.17     Load owner

 

Owner of the goods and freight being transported.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.2.18    Logistics organisations

 

A company which plans, implements, and controls the movement and storage of goods, services or information within a supply chain and between the points of origin and consumption. Various logistic companies handle some or all of these supply chain functions, depending on a client’s logistical needs.

 

 

 

12.2.19    Public safety answering point

 

A public safety answering point (PSAP) is a call centre facility responsible for answering calls to an emergency telephone number for emergency response, police, firefighting and ambulance services.

 

Note: there is a strong linkage here, between freight and fleet operations and the domain of e-safety (with applications such as eCall, see section 11[ecall]).

 

 

 

 

12.2.20   Traffic Managers

 

Entities responsible for the safe and efficient use through monitoring and control of traffic and activities on the road network.

 

 

 

12.2.21    Urban administrations

 

Statutory bodies which exist within a jurisdiction and a specific area of responsibility delivering services and capabilities for the benefit of citizens, enterprises and social infrastructure. Urban administrations typically seek to provide policy and investment (both capital and on-going resource operational expenditure) to achieve a set of often competing policy and strategy objectives.  Concerning freight and fleet operations, urban administrations often seek to ensure liveability of the urban realm, often considering air quality, noise pollution levels, mobility and the balance and connectivity for different modes of transport (vehicle, bicycle, foot traffic, other modes); but also supporting the provisioning of services to citizens, and public and private enterprises; and opportunities to develop local enterprises and social society.

 

 

[1] United Nations Convention on the Carriage of Goods by Sea, 1978

 
M1-HGVs.jpg
 
 

12.3    Main functional areas

12.3.1    Overview

 

As described above, this section is focussed on the transport-related aspect of freight and fleet operations and the standards that support these aspects.  As can be seen (in section 12.3.3 and 12.3.4, below) the way to subdivide aspects has been addressed differently by different stakeholder groups and approaches. 

 

This section provides linkages to standards in the following domains:

  • Freight & fleet – systems architecture

  • Content identification and communication

  • Regulated vehicles – monitoring

  • Dangerous Goods – Information, Monitoring and Emergency Response

  • Freight Vehicle Parking Information Services

 

There is also inclusion of a specific sector use case covering automotive visibility in the distribution supply chain.

Each domain is described below.

 

 

 

12.3.2    Architecture/Terminology

12.3.2.1    Purpose

 

The purpose of this functional area is to integrate systems and tools needed to enable effective freight and fleet operations and management.

 

Freight and fleet is a complex functional area, with many actors, encompassing a range of mechanisms for tracking and control, regulatory monitoring, to optimisation of the vehicle fleet and freight operations. The ITS systems and tools in this application area need to:

 

  • align with, and support, policy choices and decisions

  • take account of business practices, commercial arrangements, management of both the freight cargo and the vehicle fleet

  • support regulatory monitoring and statutory reporting requirements

  • provide interfaces with other relevant disciplines such as access to traffic information and navigation and routing functions to support optimisation of delivery routes and schedules

 

Due to a range of local factors, legacy operations, commercial competition and the multiplicity of actors involved, no singular architectural model exists, but standards do support functional, organisation and system architecture views on how to organise freight and fleet enterprises, and provide common building blocks to meet specific functional needs.

 

The task of designing, delivering and managing an overall architecture is likely to be focussed primarily with commercial entities with required interfaces to the relevant policy and regulatory authorities.

 

 

 

12.3.2.2    Relevant Standards

 

There are no standards in the ITS domain that specifically address architectural design of freight and fleet management systems as a whole. 

 

Architectural frameworks for ITS (see Section 7 [architectures]), such as FRAME and ARC-IT, recognise freight and fleet management (and commercial vehicle operations) as a distinct set of functions, see section 12.3.3 and 12.3.4 respectively.

 

Some specific aspects for freight and fleet are supported by architectural standards.

 

Freight and intermodal transfer are heavily regulated, thus general frameworks that set up rules and roles are essential.

 

  • In the area of freight transfer, the ISO 26683-1 standard defines the overall context and architecture and also identifies the relevant standards – see section 12.3.6.

  • In the field of intermodal transfer, a general framework is provided in ISO TS 17187 – see section 12.3.6.

  • A general framework for regulated vehicles is provided in the ISO 15638 series of standards, in particular in its Part 1 and Part 3 – see section 12.3.4.

 

 

 

12.3.2.3     Freight and Fleet functions within FRAME

FRAME - European Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Framework Architecture, is outlined in Section 7 [architectures].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 12.1 FRAME Architecture

 

 

Freight and fleet concepts appear in the FRAME architecture under its Functional Area 8. Manage Freight and Fleet Operations with the description – which enables the management of Freight and Fleet Operations. This shall control the use of freight vehicles and their transportation of goods. The use of other modes of freight transport shall also be supported. An interface to the Provide Safety and Emergency Facilities Area shall also be included to enable the provision of information about hazardous goods. Route planning for this and other types of goods shall be provided through the interface to the Provide Traveller Journey Assistance Area.

 

This Functional Area which is sub-divided into 3 sub-areas (High Level Functions):

 

1.   Manage Logistics and Freight - cover activities related to the logistic chain from the supplier to the receiver of goods.  It shall include an inter-modal transport activity that shall enable the optimisation of the transport infrastructure with respect to mobility, security and environment constraints.  

 

Component lower-level functions are:

  • Manage Freight Business Transactions

  • Prepare Freight Operations

  • Control Freight/Cargo Operations

  • Manage Inter-modal Transport Synchronisation

  • Freight Operations Performance Evaluation

2.      Manage Commercial Fleet - covering activities related to the management, the planning, the control, the evaluation and the maintenance of a fleet centre and its resources.  

 

Component lower-level functions are:

  • Manage Fleet Business Transactions

  • Manage Fleet Operations

  • Evaluate Fleet Operations Performance

 

 

 

3.   Manage vehicle/driver/cargo/equipment - be in charge to manage the trip (i.e. all tasks needed by driver/vehicle/equipment to perform cargo transport orders).  Fleet management of driver/vehicle/equipment (i.e. Maintenance, employment management) are excluded from that function.  They shall be found within FRAME 8.2.2.3 Manage Fleet Resources.  Consequently, it shall process all information coming directly from vehicle, driver, cargo and transport equipment (such as trailer) during trip.  This function shall also realise the interface with the fleet manager during the trip: direct visibility for the fleet manager to trip data, and reception and processing of operational and commercial instructions from the fleet manager.  The breakdown of this Function has been designed accordingly to result provided by COMETA

 

 

Component lower-level functions are:

--Manage Task and Transport Order
--Monitor Resources
--Comply with Regulation

 

 

12.3.2.4    Freight and Fleet functions within ARC-IT

 

ARC-IT, see Section 7 [architectures], describes most elements related to freight and fleet operations within the Service Area "Commercial Vehicle Operations" (link) which address the management of the efficiency, safety, and operation of commercial vehicle fleets and the movement of freight.

 

It includes activities that expedite the authorization process for freight to move across national and other jurisdictional boundaries, activities that expedite inter-modal transfers of freight and the operation of freight vehicles that exchange information on the motor carrier, the vehicle, the driver, and, in some cases, the cargo to enhance freight operations and management.

 

Within the "Commercial Vehicle Operations" Service Area ARC-IT defines 22 Service Packages, given below. For brevity, the descriptions of each Service Area are highly abbreviated versions of those found in ARC-IT, terms and descriptions spelling have been anglicized and modified to use language more appropriate to the European operating and regulatory environment. They are provided here, in part, to show the range of freight and fleet functional areas that can be considered:

  • CVO01: Carrier Operations and Fleet Management, that covers the monitoring and management of a fleet of vehicles; this includes maintenance of fleet vehicles with on-board monitoring equipment. Records of vehicle mileage, preventative maintenance and repairs are maintained.

 

  • CVO02: Freight Administration, covers the tracking of the movement of cargo and monitors the cargo condition with on-going indications of the state of the various freight equipment reported. Interconnections are provided to intermodal freight shippers and intermodal freight depots for tracking of cargo from origin to destination.

 

  • CVO03: Electronic Clearance, providing automated clearance at roadside check facilities retrieving infrastructure snapshots of critical carrier, vehicle, and driver data to be used to sort passing vehicles. This allows a goods driver/vehicle/carrier to pass roadside facilities at highway speeds using vehicle to infrastructure (V2I) Communications. The roadside check facility may be equipped with Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI), weighing sensors, communications equipment, etc. Communications may be implemented using a range of technologies from transponder data readers through connected vehicle short range communications.

 

  • CVO04: Commercial Vehicle (CV) Administrative Processes, which supports programme administration and enrolment, and provides for electronic application, processing, fee collection, issuance, and distribution of CVO credential and tax filing. Through enrolment processes, current profile databases are maintained in Commercial Vehicle Administration Centres and snapshots of this data are made available to the roadside check facilities.

 

  • CVO05: Commercial Vehicle Parking, provides parking information to freight and commercial vehicle operators both pre-trip and on route, and also potentially provides the ability for the commercial vehicle driver, or fleet manager to request a parking reservation.

 

  • CVO06: Freight Signal Priority, provides support for traffic signal priority for freight and commercial vehicles travelling in a signalized network; with the goal being to reduce stops and delays to increase travel time reliability for freight traffic, and to enhance safety at intersections.

 

 

  • CVO08: Smart Roadside and Virtual WIM (Weigh-in-motion), includes the delivery of capabilities related to wireless roadside inspections and electronic screening/virtual weighing stations. This capability provides for the interrogation at mainline speeds of a commercial vehicle when it has entered a control segment or geofenced area, and can also be used to verify that the commercial vehicle meets vehicle weight (via weigh in motion capability) or dimension requirements.

 

  • CVO09: Freight-specific Dynamic Travel Planning, provides both pre-trip and on route travel planning, routing, and commercial vehicle related traveller information, which includes information such as truck parking locations and current status. The information will be based on data collected from the commercial fleet as well as general traffic data collection capabilities.

 

  • CVO10: Road Weather Information for Freight Carriers, provides a special case of the Road Weather Advisories and Warnings for Motorists service package that focuses on Freight Carrier users. It provides the capability to collect road weather data from connected vehicles and using that data to develop short term warnings or advisories that can be provided to individual commercial vehicles or to commercial vehicle dispatchers. The information may come from either vehicles operated by the general public and commercial entities (including passenger cars and trucks) or special purpose vehicles and public fleet vehicles (such as snowploughs, maintenance vehicles, and other agency pool vehicles).

 

  • CVO11: Freight Drayage Optimization, covers the information exchanges between all intermodal parties to provide current drayage truck load matching and container availability and appointment scheduling at railway and waterborne freight terminals.

 

  • CVO12: Hazardous and Dangerous Goods (HAZMAT) Management, integrates incident management capabilities with commercial vehicle tracking to assure effective treatment of dangerous goods material transport, including response to incidents. Tracking is performed by a Fleet and Freight Management Centre. Emergency Management Centres are notified by the Commercial Vehicle and the Fleet and Freight Management Centre of the dangerous goods vehicle location and information about the dangerous goods load. If an incident occurs, Emergency Management Centres can use the information to coordinate the response.

 

  • CVO13: Roadside Dangerous Goods (HAZMAT) Security Detection and Mitigation, provides the capability to detect and classify security sensitive dangerous goods on commercial vehicles using roadside sensing and imaging technology. Credentials information can be accessed to verify if the commercial driver, vehicle and carrier are permitted to transport the identified dangerous goods. If the credentials analysis and sensed dangerous goods load information do not agree, the vehicle can be signalled to pull off the road, and supports monitoring by regulatory authorities.

 

  • CVO14: CV Driver Security Authentication, provides the ability for Fleet and Freight Management to detect when an unauthorized commercial vehicle driver attempts to drive their vehicle based on stored driver identity information. In addition, Fleet and Freight Management to disable a specific vehicle in their fleet.

 

  • CVO15: Fleet and Freight Security, provides enhanced security for commercial vehicle fleets and freight. Internal and external alerts and advisories are monitored to identify potential threats to the safety and security of the fleet and freight. It provides for the planning and tracking of three aspects of commercial vehicle shipments. For each shipment, the commercial vehicle, the freight equipment, and the commercial vehicle driver are monitored for consistency with the planned assignment, monitoring of loads and load security and adherence to intended routing.

 

  • CVO16: Electronic Work Diaries, is designed to collect information on the operation of a commercial vehicle, to log driver activity (work), and to report that information to regulators as well as fleet managers, while operating under various privacy regimes including that of the fleet manager, the local government and the national government.

 

 

 

  • CVO19: Intelligent Speed Compliance, uses the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) to independently monitor the speed of a freight vehicle and provide that information to regulatory authorities. It can be used to verify that commercial vehicles are not exceeding a set speed threshold, and/or to detect faulty speed limiter devices.

 

 

  • CVO21: International Border Electronic Clearance, provides for automated clearance at international border crossings, processing the entry documentation for vehicle, cargo, and driver, checks compliance with import/export and immigration regulations, handles duty fee processing, and reports the results of the crossing event to manage release of commercial vehicle, cargo, and driver across an international border. It interfaces with administrative systems used by customs and border protection, immigration, carriers, and service providers (e.g., brokers) and inspection systems at international border crossings to generate, process, and store entry documentation.

 

 

 

 

12.3.2.5    Legislation regarding system architectures for freight and fleet operations

 

There is currently no Europe-wide legislation that requires a specific approach to be adopted to freight and fleet operations system architectures.

 

Systems using data that may be considered personal (generally originating in the identity of the user, using customer, driver, etc.) will be subject to European regulation on the processing of such data, that is to say to GDPR (REGULATION (EU) 2016/679 of 27 April 2016 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data). This is likely to have implications for cybersecurity design and practice across the architecture.

 

 

 

12.3.3    Content identification and communication

12.3.3.1    Purpose

 

The identification of freight elements falls at many levels (item, package, container, vehicle) and can be complex as freight items move, and are transhipped, through the transport network.  With a particular focus on road transport and inter-modal transfers standards have been developed for the definition of application interface profiles for the exchange of land transport data using current technologies and existing standards for item identification, package identification, container identification, and international standards and practices regarding freight and its movement.

 

 

 

12.3.3.2    Stakeholders

  • Consignor/Shipper

  • Consignee/Receive

  • Customer, ultimate consignee

  • Dispatchers / schedulers

  • Driver

  • Fleet owners/managers/operators (incl. buses, taxis, other passenger vehicle fleets)

  • Freight carrier

  • Freight consolidator

  • Freight forwarder

  • Intermodal hub managers/operators

  • Loading bay controllers

  • Logistics organisations

  • Load owner

 

 

 

12.3.3.3    Systems context

 

In a scenario of land transport and logistics, whether international or local, it is often difficult for a consignor and a consignee to know the physical real time location of cargo after consigning the cargo to a transport and logistics service provider. Appropriate visibility to other stakeholders in the freight delivery chain can also be challenging. Where a cargo is transferred from one haulier to another, obtaining information of the manifest at a detailed level is often difficult. Auditing the actual content of a consignment on route; and monitoring cargo condition and stress measurement information during road transport is also difficult.  This is especially the case, in instances of sealed land conveyances such as sealed intermodal containers. This is a different task to that of progressing order administration from consignor to consignee.

 

Seamless exchange of accurate, complete, and timely data at transportation hand-offs has always been important for efficiency and accountability.  There is now a growing understanding of needs for security of transport information, traceability of cargo loads, and for transfer of information related to security against terrorism as well as theft and traditional contraband.

 

 

There is no single organization responsible for standards through the intermodal supply chain. To achieve a coherent set of standards requires coordination among the various international organizations working on the patchwork of the overall suite of standards.

16 pkg Fig-02_Frame_Architecture.png

12.3.3.4    Key standards

 

Part 1 of ISO 26683 — Intelligent transport systems — Freight land conveyance content identification and communication (FLC-CIC) — Part 1: Context, architecture and referenced standards,

 

specifies the data concepts applicable to the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer.

 

Part 1 of ISO 26683 focuses on a single "thread" of the overall end to end supply chain. These data concepts include information entities (data elements), aggregated/associated information entities (groups of data elements) and messages that comprise information exchanges at transport interfaces along the chain of participants responsible for the delivery of goods from the point of origin through to the final destination.

 

ISO 26683-1:2013 provides the context for application interface profiles for the exchange of land transport data using current technologies and existing standards for item identification, package identification, container identification, and international standards and practices regarding freight and its movement.

 

This work is integrated closely with ‘Universal Business Language (UBL)’ espoused by OASIS Open - OASIS Open (oasis-open.org)  and refers to the UN/CEFACT standards (Data Elements TDED, Core Components Technical Specifications and Library CCL).

 

  • Universal Business Language (UBL) by OASIS is intended to help solve commonality issues by defining a generic XML interchange format for business documents that can be restricted or extended to meet the requirements of particular industries. UBL provides, amongst other things, a suite of structured business objects and their associated semantics expressed as reusable data components and common business documents and a library of XML schemas for reusable data components - the common data elements of everyday business documents.

 

  • UN/CEFACT standards - is the United Nations Centre for Trade Facilitation and Electronic Business; an intergovernmental body of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). UN/CEFACT has produced over 30 trade facilitation recommendations and a range of electronic business standards (collectively referred to as “instruments”) which are used throughout the world by both governments and the private sector.

  • UN/CEFACT Data Elements TDED – A directory of standard data elements intended to facilitate interchange of data in international trade. These standard data elements can be used with any method of data interchange, on paper documents as well as with other means of data communication; they can be selected for transmission one by one, or used within a particular system of interchange rules, e.g. the United Nations syntax rules for Electronic Data Interchange For Administration, Commerce and Transport (UN/EDIFACT) developed within the UNECE and published as International Standard ISO 9735. Sections 1, 2, 3, 4 and 9 of the Directory constitute International Standard ISO 7372.

 

  • The Core Component Technical specification (CCTS) was developed by UN/CEFACT and ISO Technical Committee (TC) 154. It provides a methodology for semantic data modelling in a syntax independent form. It is used by many organisations who require a specification to allow them to model their business messages in a consistent and reusable object model. The specification also requires the following formal naming rules as defined in ISO 11179, which are based on UML and Object oriented programming. CCTS provides a standard way to describe data and their relationships for both Programmers and Data Modellers. Once the business information is stored in this way, it can also be easily transformed into syntactical forms such as XML or UN/EDIFACT. Also because of the close relationship with UML, it can be represented in various UML Editors, such as Enterprise Architect. Effectively this means code can be created directly from information constructed using the specification which assures interoperability.

 

 

There are many situations where the freight vehicle tractor and trailer combination change, or loads are repackaged, during the course of a journey from consignor to consignee.

 

 

Further, even where such comprehensive systems are in place, they rely on the level of detail that exists within its controlling computer system, and without the ability to monitor the actual contents, there is no possibility to:

 

 

  • audit the actual contents of the consignment. This is particularly difficult in the case of a sealed intermodal container (ISO 668 and subsequent related standards for freight containers)

 

  • monitor the condition of the contents of the consignment (cargo stress measurement information).

 

 

The ISO 26683 family of standards are therefore complementary to the context of ISO TS 24533 (Intelligent Transport Systems — Data dictionary and message set to facilitate the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer — Road transport information exchanges), see below, and may well provide sources of data required by such systems, and an electronic auditing capability has yet to be embraced by ISO TS 24533. ISO 26683 is complementary to ISO 7372.

 

 

Further detail concerning the complementary nature of the ISO 26683 family of Standards to the following can be found in ISO 26683-1, clauses 5 and 6:

 

 

  • ISO 24533 - Intelligent Transport Systems — Data dictionary and message set to facilitate the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer — Road transport information exchanges,

  • EFM – the US Department of Transportation Electronic Freight Management initiative

  • ISO 17687 - Transport Information and Control Systems (TICS) — General fleet management and commercial freight operations — Data dictionary and message sets for electronic identification and monitoring of hazardous materials/dangerous goods transportation,

  • IEEE 1512.3 - IEEE Standard for Hazardous Material Incident Management Message Sets for Use by Emergency Management Centers

  • UN/CEFACT, particularly UN/CEFACT UMM (Modelling Methodology)

  • ISO 7372 - Trade data interchange — Trade data elements directory,

  • OASIS/UBL.

 

 

The ISO 26683 family of standards provide a data agglomeration/aggregation capability as one means to capture and transfer information about the content of the cargo load and its condition to a central system. Therefore the ISO 26683 family of International Standards can also support both ISO TS 24533  and ISO 17687/IEEE1512.3  instantiations.  ISO 26683 is designed to present data to end-to-end cargo application systems, it does not provide end to end system (consignor to consignee) system design.

 

 

The ISO 26683 series envisages that a combination of existing technologies can be used to agglomerate/aggregate relevant data and use a tractor/trailer mounted communications means to realize real time cargo visibility of land transport, and is thus not dependent on future technologies or technologies currently in research and development phases (although will be suitable for future technical means to deliver its data).

 

 

Part 1 of ISO 26683 is the first part of a multi-part family of standards which provides context and high-level architecture for all parts of the ISO 26683 family of International Standards:

 

 

ISO 26683-2:2013 - Application interface profiles

 

- defines application interface profiles to agglomerate/aggregate and transfer land cargo transport data to provide improved land cargo transport data and specifies one or more modes of transfer using available ICT technologies.

 

 

ISO 26683-3:2019 – Monitoring cargo condition information during transport

 

– specifies the handling of on-board cargo stress measurement information during road transport establishing requirements for transport and condition monitoring of transported consignments such as agri-food and perishable goods, through applications, models, processes, and information bundles. This document applies to both domestic and cross-border transport of transported consignments.

 

 

ISO/TS 24533:2012 - Intelligent transport systems — Electronic information exchange to facilitate the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer — Road transport information exchange methodology (Link)

 

seeks to fill a role focusing on data exchange needs for the international supply chain that relate specifically to road carrier transport including data needs for the interface with all modes of transportation since freight movement normally includes interfaces with other modes of transportation.

Some international shipments are carried out entirely by road carrier transport, but most begin and end with road carrier service and travel by other modes in the course of the shipment. ISO/TS 24533:2012 focuses on road carrier transport interfaces through the supply chain, or those data items that deal specifically with the key pieces of transport information critical to getting the goods to the marketplace without delay related to data sharing. Therefore, the interfacing modes' data structures and formats must accommodate each other to assure efficiency and security from end to end.  Road transport, railway and waterborne transport are vital components of intermodal, international shipping. It is recognized that a robust intermodal standard must include interface connections to all of these modes, and may need to be proven through demonstration tests.

 

To achieve a coherent set of transport standards requires coordination among the various international organizations working on component parts of these international standards. ISO TC 204 has in the development of ISO/TS 24533:2012 advanced the idea of close coordination among other appropriate ISO Technical Committees, OASIS, IATA, IEC, CEN, UN Centre for Trade Facilitation and Electronic Business, and the World Customs Organization.

 

The vision expressed in ISO/TS 24533:2012 is to allow electronic data sharing through many-to-many relationships between supply chain partners which will help ensure sustaining standards. One-to-one relationships require only two partners to have standard data relationships with each other, and could require other partners to adopt the standards of the original two or require third party translators, which increases costs in the transport of goods. The many-to-many relationships also ensure that data initiated by the first partner will allow other partners equal access and can also help customs agencies to access data early in the progress of goods coming through the supply chain.

 

ISO/TS 24533:2012 provides:

  • A Concept of Operations for the Road Transport component of Intermodal freight

  • An overview of the physical freight flow

  • A model of information exchange transactions, including operational scenarios, messaging triggering actions

  • Use cases for information exchange for the road transport component of intermodal freight.

12.3.4    Regulated vehicles – monitoring

12.3.4.1    Purpose

 

Focuses on freight and fleet activities that are subject to legislation and regulation that results in monitoring actions being taken on identifiable vehicles for a specific regulated purpose.  Legislation and regulation differs across jurisdictions, as does the nature of transport monitoring undertaken.

 

12.3.4.2     Stakeholders

  • Customs organizations

  • Dispatchers / schedulers

  • Driver

  • Fleet owners/managers/operators

  • Freight carrier

  • Government and enforcement agencies

  • Operators of regulated freight vehicles

  • System providers

  • Service provider

 

12.3.4.3     Systems context

 

Many ITS technologies have been embraced by commercial transport operators and freight owners, in the areas of fleet management, safety and security. Telematics applications have also been developed for governmental use. Some jurisdictions have legislation requiring persistent or regular on-going monitoring of regulated freight vehicle operations. 

 

In general, this form of legislation and associated requirements have arisen in response to road safety concerns.  A regulated freight vehicle is (often but not always designed to haul commercial freight) that is subject to regulations determined by the jurisdiction as to its use on the road system of the jurisdiction in regulated circumstances, subject to certain conditions, and in compliance with specific regulations for that class of vehicle.

 

In Australia, each of the Australian Commonwealth states has developed independent requirements and legislation for regulated freight vehicles, in response to their own needs.  The Australian Transport Certification Authority acknowledged the identified benefits to be gained from developing and seeking deployment of a generic telematics communications platform, aimed to address a range of regulated applications and support multiple communications technologies.  Initial legislation and the supporting service delivery tended to be focussed on abnormal freight loads (such as very large transporters), but as the architectural approach has been successfully deployed, additional legislation has been forthcoming seeking to utilise the capabilities offered by the approach.

 

Regulatory services in use or being considered vary from country to country, but include:

  • Digital tachograph

  • e-call

  • Electronic on-board recorders

  • Hazardous goods tracking

  • On-board mass monitoring

  • Vehicle access monitoring

  • Vehicle charging/road pricing

Additional applications with a regulatory impact have been developed include:

  • Driver works hour monitoring

  • Fatigue management

  • Heavy vehicle charging based on mass, location, distance and time.

  • Parking facility information

  • Speed monitoring and

 

The most significant standards within this functional area are the ISO 15638 series for TARV (TARV - Telematics Applications for Regulated vehicles) standards. 

 

 

 

12.3.4.4    Key standards

The TARV series of Standards have been developed to be provided in an environment that support multiple communications bearers and also can be provided in a commercial context of multiple service providers.

 

Figure 12.2 ISO 15638 TARV Architecture

 

 

This suite of standards addresses and defines the framework for a range of cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles. The overall scope includes the concept of operation, legal and regulatory issues, and the generic cooperative provision of services to regulated commercial freight vehicles, using an on-board ITS platform. The framework is based on a (multiple) service provider-oriented approach and includes the provisions for the approval and auditing of service providers.

 

This suite of standards deliverables provides:

  • A framework for the provision of cooperative telematics application services for regulated commercial freight vehicles

  • A description of the concept of operation, regulatory aspects and options and the role models;

  • A conceptual architecture using an on-board platform and wireless communications to a regulator or his agent;

  • Definition of several regulated or regulation-related applications

 

There are currently 24 TARV Standards Deliverables.

  • Parts 1-7 provide the overall framework, architecture and management features.

  • Parts 8-24 provide "Application level" data transfers.

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-1:2012 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Framework and architecture (Link).

 

ISO 15638-1:2012 provides the following for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles:

 

  • A framework for the provision of cooperative telematics application services for regulated commercial freight vehicles;

  • A description of the concept of operation, regulatory aspects and options and the role models;

  • A conceptual architecture using an on-board platform and wireless communications to a regulator or his agent;

  • References for the key documents on which the architecture is based;

  • Details of the architecture of the facilities layer;

  • A taxonomy of the organisation of generic procedures;

  • Common terminology for the ISO 15638 family of standards.

 

ISO 15638-1:2012 is based on a (multiple) service provider oriented approach

Link to Scope

 

 

  • ISO 15638-2:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Common platform parameters using CALM (Link)

 

ISO 15638-2:2013 defines a generic cooperative ITS service platform for TARV using CALM, including protocol of coding, timing, and performance and support interfaces (such as driver ID card/USB or similar etc.).

Link to Scope

 

  • ISO 15638-3:2013 Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Operating requirements, ‘Approval Authority’ approval procedures, and enforcement provisions for the providers of regulated services  (Link)

ISO 15638-3:2013 defines provisions to enable monitoring and enforcement of regulated vehicles and approval authority approval procedures.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-4:2020 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — System security requirements (Link)

Security requirements address both hardware and software aspects.

 

Link to Scope

ISO 15638-4:2020 is currently being superseded in a C-ITS context by a new part based on ISO 21177 in order to ensure consistency with other C-ITS solutions.

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-5:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Generic vehicle information (Link)

– Generic basic vehicle and core application data provision to application service providers to be supported by in-vehicle systems (IVS) for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV), and to provide basic vehicle data for cooperative intelligent transport systems.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

  • ISO 15638-6:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Regulated applications (Link)

ISO 15638-6:2014 specifies the common roles and responsibilities of actors providing regulated application systems which use TARV to provide regulated application services for regulated commercial freight vehicles and the interoperability of key operational steps and actions required to support all TARV regulated application service systems.

Link to Scope

  • ISO 15638-7:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Other applications (Link)

ISO 15638-7:2013 provides business framework based on a (multiple) service provider oriented approach for the provision of additional unregulated services to regulated commercial freight vehicles using a common on-board telematics platform,.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

  • ISO 15638-8:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 8: Vehicle access management (VAM) (Link)

 

ISO 15638-8:2014 addresses the provision of "vehicle access management" (and monitoring) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-9:2020 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 9: Remote digital tachograph monitoring (Link)

 

This document addresses the provision of ‘Remote Digital Tachograph Monitoring' and specifies the form and content of the transmission of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-10:2017 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 10: Emergency messaging system/eCall (Link)

 

ISO 15638-10:2017 addresses the provision of ‘Emergency messaging system/eCall' using the TARV framework, architecture and communications methodology (as defined in ISO 15638‑1 to 6) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

Link to eCall

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-11:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 11: Driver work records  (Link)

 

ISO 15638-11:2014 addresses the provision of Driver Work Records (DWR) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-12:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 12: Vehicle mass monitoring (Link)

 

ISO 15638-12:2014 addresses the provision of vehicle mass monitoring (VMM) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-13 Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 13: Mass information for jurisdictional control and enforcement (MICE) (Link)

 

ISO 15638-13:2015 addresses the provision of Mass information for jurisdictional control and enforcement' and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-14 Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 14: Vehicle access control (Link)

 

ISO 15638-14:2014 addresses the provision of "vehicle access control" and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-15:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated vehicles (TARV) — Part 15: Vehicle location monitoring (Link)

 

ISO 15638-15:2014 addresses the provision of vehicle location monitoring and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-16:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 16: Vehicle speed monitoring (Link)

 

ISO 15638-16:2014 addresses the provision of vehicle speed monitoring and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-17:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 17: Consignment and location monitoring (Link)

 

ISO 15638-17:2014 addresses the provision of consignment and location monitoring and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-18:2017 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 18: ADR (Dangerous goods) (Link)

 

ISO 15638-18:2017 addresses the provision of "ADR (dangerous goods)" and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-19:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 19: Vehicle parking facility (Link)

 

ISO 15638-19:2013 addresses the provision of ?Vehicle Parking Facility' and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-20:2020 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 20: weigh-in-motion monitoring (Link)

 

 

This document addresses the provision of ‘weigh-in-motion monitoring' and specifies the form and content of the transmission of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-21:2018 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 21: Monitoring of regulated vehicles using roadside sensors and data collected from the vehicle for enforcement and other purposes (Link)

 

The ISO 15638 series of standards defines the framework  for online fleet management of regulated commercial freight vehicles utilizing data communication between in-vehicle systems and an application service provider via on-board communication unit interfacing with road monitoring infrastructure. This document defines an extension to the existing role model conceptual architecture by adding roadside sensors to the model for additional data collection path for enhancement of the system.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

  • ISO 15638-22:2019 - Intelligent transport systems — Framework for collaborative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 22: Freight vehicle stability monitoring (Link)

 

The ISO 15638 series of standards (Parts 1 to 21) define the framework for online fleet management of regulated commercial freight vehicles utilizing data communication between in-vehicle systems and an application service provider via on-board communication unit interfacing with road monitoring infrastructure and roadside sensors. In this document, an unregulated service architecture frame work for freight vehicle stability monitoring architecture is defined. This statement does not preclude the regulated service where jurisdiction needs such a function.

 

Link to Scope

 

 

 

 

 

  • ISO/AWI 15638-23 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for collaborative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 23: Tyre monitoring - Under development

 

 

This part of ISO 15638 addresses the provision of tyre pressure monitoring and specifies the form and content of the transmission of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

Link to Scope

 

  • ISO/DIS 15638-24 - Intelligent transport systems — Framework for collaborative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 24: Safety information provisioning – Under development -

 

Vehicle sensor data and/or road side sensor data are sent out to service provider. Service provider provides users the safety information for the vehicle. Various V2X data exchange paths are to be defined. (road sensor data to service provider through OBU or road authorities).

Link to Scope

fig 12,2  TARV Arch.PNG

12.3.5    Dangerous Goods – Information, Monitoring and Emergency Response

12.3.5.1    Purpose

 

The purpose of this functional area is to provide systems and processes to support data collection and information exchange concerning the road freight transport of dangerous goods.

 

In Europe, the transport of dangerous goods by road is subject to national implementation of the UNECE ADR (Européen relatif au transport international des marchandises Dangereuses par Route) which is controlled and issued by UNECE.  ADR is a requirement in Europe and other countries. For further information see ADR 2021 (files) | UNECE.

 

 

 

12.3.5.2    Stakeholders

  • Government and enforcement agencies

  • Operators of freight vehicles transporting dangerous goods

  • System providers

  • Service providers

  • Fleet owners/managers/operators

  • Driver

  • Emergency responders/Public Service Answering Points

 

 

 

12.3.5.3    Systems context

 

The transport of dangerous goods in the road transport network is unavoidable.  By international agreement the regulations in force governing the transport of dangerous goods across Europe are governed by ADRADR is consistent with that of the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, Model Regulations, the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (of the International Maritime Organization), the Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (of the International Civil Aviation Organization) and the Regulations concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail (of the Intergovernmental Organisation for International Carriage by Rail).

ADR itself requires defined information to be carried with the vehicle. Telematics applications and services are being deployed to support the digital collection of data, exchange and appropriate use. These use cases include:

  • Load and consignment monitoring and tracking by the freight operator, and other appropriate freight transport interested parties

  • Legitimate enquiry, under regulation, for ADR data, by police, customs and other regulatory oversight and enforcement agencies

  • Legitimate enquiry by insurers

  • Legitimate enquiry by traffic or port/terminal authorities under an agreed scheme for data sharing

  • Access to ADR by emergency responders, public service answering points, etc.

 

Due to the potential for commercial gain, terrorist misuse, or the inappropriate tracking of the movement of dangerous goods, there is sensitivity to ensure that any digital communications are subject to suitable regimes for security, encryption, authentication and trust.

 

 

12.3.5.4    Key standards

 

Part 18 of the ISO 15638 TARV series of standards - Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 18: ADR (Dangerous Goods) transport monitoring (ADR) provides the definition of an application for the secure exchange of dangerous goods data between the vehicle (and vehicle driver), the vehicle operator, appropriate jurisdictions and suitably authorised service providers, including ADR monitoring application service providers, for the purpose of collection and monitoring of ADR data.

 

 

Figure 12.3 TARV ADR

ISO 15638-18:2017 defines the concept of operations for remote monitoring of ADR data with the objective of providing legitimate interested parties with key information concerning the regulated vehicle and its consignment, to support ADR regulations together with other key data, as implemented by jurisdictions.

 

The points of demand for digital ADR data will vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, so the nexus of this service is the provision of data from the regulated vehicle to a landside application service provider who will know who provide it to, when, and in what format.

 

The required data may be entirely collated and stored on-board the regulated vehicle,  or may be a combination of information provisioned on-board the regulated vehicle together with information held in the database of the application service provider. A service provider may provide all of the current trip consignment data from its own database, or a pointer to a database where it may be obtained (for example one maintained by the operator), or may store some or all of the current consignment data in the in-vehicle system (IVS) of the regulated vehicle and contribute the shortfall from its central database or provide a pointer to a database where it may be obtained (for example one maintained by the operator) obtained from the regulated vehicle IVS.

 

Architecturally, consistent with other TARV applications, for reasons of security, a direct and targeted enquiry for data from a particular vehicle shall be acknowledged, the communication session closed, and a new communication session opened to a predetermined IPv6 address stored in the data pantry or app library of the IVS, and the data sent to that address.

Two new parts of TARV ( numbers not yet assigned), will enable direct communication in an ISO 21217/ ISO 21177 cybersecure C-ITS paradigm.

 

ISO 15638-18:2017 defines the structure of the data to be provided.

 

Complementary to ISO 15638 Part 10 of the TARV series of standards (ISO 15638-10:2017 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 10: Emergency messaging system/eCall) provides an application definition for the provision of emergency messaging/emergency call services.

 

These general services may be extended to provide basic information concerning an emergency message in an extraordinary event for vehicles carrying ADR (dangerous) goods.

 

What constitutes an extraordinary event that may generate an emergency message is not defined with ISO 15638-10:2017, but is likely to be an incident/accident involving the regulated commercial freight vehicle, an alarm condition on the regulated commercial freight vehicle, a hi-jack, driver disablement, and in the case of vehicles carrying ADR (dangerous) goods, may be a breakdown or similar incident.

 

In a similar manner to the TARV application for ADR data the European eCall standards series contain specific standards relating to the provisioning of data from heavy goods vehicles including ADR data.

 

EN 16405:2017 Intelligent transport systems - Ecall - Additional data concept specification for heavy goods vehicle defines an additional data concept (see section 11 [eCall]) ‘optional additional data concept’ - EN 15722), that may be transferred from a goods carrying vehicle to a ‘Public Safety Answering Points’ (PSAP) in the event of a crash or emergency via an eCall communication session.  EN 16405:2017 supports two variants: one (schema A) for use where information about the goods (ADR classified or not) is known in the eCall device; the second variant (schema B) is for use where such information is to be fetched from elsewhere.

 

CEN TS 17642 Intelligent Transport Systems - eSafety - eCall Interface for PSAPs to access cargo and dangerous goods databases extends the work of EN 16405:2017.  The scope of CEN TS 17642 is limited to the provision of eCall from a commercial vehicle prime mover /rigid body truck  designed for conveying cargo. (UNECE Category N) and specifies the requirements for the use of 112-eCall by a commercial vehicle prime mover /rigid body truck and defines the interface between the PSAPs and an external transport database.

 

 

The specification defines how eCall for commercial vehicles should interact with the future eFTI standards and the prerequisites for these standards to allow the access to the relevant freight information for the PSAPSs in case of an eCall.  The so called ‘Schema A’ defines means to have information about the cargo directly inside the MSD (minimum set of Data defined in EN 15722), Schema B (also part of EN 16405:2017, see above) offers a mechanism to inform the PSAP about where and how to retrieve information of the cargo from a remote source. The underlying document focuses on this last Schema.

 

 

When a PSAP receives an eCall from a vehicle, the PSAP system will “intercept” the MSD and decode its contents for further use in the emergency process. As long as the information can be used directly (e.g. number of occupants, direction of travel, last known location) this can be displayed to the operator. However, the MSD does contain elements of data that trigger a lookup of information. The basic MSD contains the VIN number that should be looked up using EUCARIS to get the most up to date vehicle registration information. If the MSD contains additional data, the PSAP system needs to apply the correct decoding template which results in either directly usable information (like the cargo information in Schema A) or information that again triggers a lookup, or both.

 

 

As previously mentioned, 16405 Schema B offers means to inform the PSAP about how and where to retrieve the cargo information, but this was purposely left flexible. There is however a need, or at least a strong wish, to standardise the way cargo information can be retrieved from a remote source. This document addresses this need.

 

 

The European Commission has launched a legislative process to harmonize the Electronic freight transport information (eFTI (see EU Regulation 2020/1056) and to provide the legislative framework and a basic architecture for the exchange of freight transport information. The access of PSAPs to freight information as the information about the loaded dangerous goods should follow the future eFTI standards to avoid the handling of several interfaces of authorities to freight data.

 

 

The goal of this document is to prepare the eCall interfaces for the new eFTI standards and define prerequisites for the eFTI standards that need to be fulfilled by eFTI to allow the access to the necessary information for eCall.

 

 

 

12.3.6    Freight Vehicle Parking Information Services

123.6.1   Purpose

The purpose of this functional area is to provide systems and processes to support forms of information and reservation services oriented to freight and fleet parking places – often located on long-distance corridors or near arterial routes in large conurbations and cities.

 

In Europe, particularly on major cross-border long distance haulage routes, significant safety and traffic management issues can arise with freight and fleet vehicle stopping and parking in unsuitable, sometimes dangerous locations.  Provisioning of information from traffic managers and operators of rest areas and motorway/autoroute service areas provides a valuable source of information to support improved route and stop planning by freight and logistic operators and their drivers.

 

 

 

12.3.6.2    Stakeholders

 

  • Freight and logistics operators and managers

  • Insurers

  • In-vehicle fleet system and service providers

  • Traffic management authorities

  • Parking operators

  • Service providers

 

 

 

12.3,6.3    Systems context

 

It is both a road safety and crime prevention policy measure to be able to provide freight and commercial vehicle operators and drivers with reliable information on suitable parking places to enable improved journey planning, especially for vehicle stops. Combined with stricter driving hours and route restrictions, there is a significant and continuing growth of long-distance transport that involves the requirement for overnight or rest period stops. There is concern about a trend of attacks on cargo and vehicles, coupled with the lack of adequate rest facilities for drivers. The establishment of (especially secure) truck parking sites and associated information services is becoming increasingly important to help reduce crime, improve road safety, and improve driver working conditions.

 

Deployed systems for the monitoring and management of parking areas for commercial and freight vehicles use a range of different technologies.  Different operational and commercial settings dictate the level of sophistication of monitoring systems for example, with paid-for services generally taking a more rigorous (and generally costly) approach to recording the presence of identifiable vehicles.

 

Standards have been developed to support the data collection and exchange of information concerning freight parking facilities. The predominant standard for the parking provider provisioning of data, under EU regulations, is Part 6 of the CEN "DATEX II" series (CEN TS 16167-6:2015), see 12.3.9.4 below.

 

In addition, the provisioning of this data to vehicle operators and drivers is supported by further standards.  For suitably-equipped vehicles utilising the TARV framework for regulated vehicle services, see above in section 12.3.7.4, Part 19 ('Vehicle Parking Facilities’ (ISO 15638-19)) of the ISO 15638 TARV series of standards supports a means of provisioning freight vehicle parking information into these vehicles. 

 

General parking information services are also provisioned through Traffic and Traveller information services supported by standards series, such as TPEG2, where ISO/TS 21219-14:2016 – Intelligent transport systems — Traffic and travel information (TTI) via transport protocol experts group, generation 2 (TPEG2) — Part 14: Parking information application (TPEG2-PKI)  is specified, see Section 22.

 

 

 

12.3.6.4   Key standards

 

Part 6 of the CEN "DATEX II" series (CEN TS 16157-6:2015) for traffic management information exchange provides data structures for the exchange of parking data, in general. In response to the requirements arising from EU Delegated Regulation 2013/885 for information services for safe and secure truck parking, Part 6 of the CEN "DATEX II" provides a specific profile and mapping defining how the Standard should be used to support the publication of data conforming to the requirements of the Regulation.

 

 

CEN/TS 16157-6 provides data structures defining parking data, structured to support 3 distinct types of publications:

 

  • ParkingTablePublication – which provides data content, primarily static in nature, concerning parking facilities (including parking sites, groups of parking sites, parking spaces and how they relate to one another), times of operation, tariff structures, limitations on use (assignments, permits and prohibitions), location and characteristics data, information on equipment and service facilities, contact information related to the parking facility, etc.

 

 

  • ParkingStatusPublication – which references across to records provided by the ParkingTablePublication, and supports a more compact provision of dynamic status information (for example occupancy, availability etc.) for parking sites/groups of parking sites/parking spaces as well as status information for a number of other specific elements from the static part of the Parking Publications model (routes, usage scenarios, equipment and service facilities etc.).

 

 

  • ParkingVehiclesPublication – provides data relating to individual parked vehicles with their characteristics and specific parking related information.

 

 

 

 

CEN/TS 16157-6 provides defined profiles of how these DATEX II publications are expected to be used in a number of use cases scenarios:

 

 

  • DATEX II profile for Truck Parking – which is a defined DATEX II profile of the DATEX II parking publications model which is required to meet the obligations compliance with the Delegated Regulation 885/2013 for the provision of information services for safe and secure parking places for trucks and commercial vehicles

 

 

  • Comprehensive DATEX II profile for urban parking information - capable of urban parking information, i.e. infrastructure and occupancy information for parking sites located in an urban context

 

 

  • Lean DATEX II profile for urban parking - to provide an information structure with reduced complexity that may be used to describe urban parking information with focus on primary data only

 

 

CEN/TS 16157-6:2015 is coherent with other Parts of the DATEX II 16157 series of standards, most notably using the DATEX II data modelling methodology, as specified in 16157-1, and location referencing methods as specified in 16157-2.

 

 

 

At the time of writing CEN/TS 16157-6 is currently under revision.

 

The Truck Parking information service supported using DATEX II Standards (see 16.5.3) seeks to provide truck related parking information between traffic managers, and between traffic managers and service providers. 

 

The regulated vehicle parking facility services using TARV Standards defines services directed to in-vehicle systems.  The TARV 'Vehicle Parking Facilities’ standard (ISO 15638-19) supports a range of service providers for the provisioning of Vehicle Parking Facility services, including:

 

  • Providers of application services to the operator/vehicle, which is not part of a fleet management system;

  • Providers of application services to the operator/vehicle, which is part of a fleet management system; 

  • Providers of a vehicle parking facility;

  • Providers of a booking reservation, payment management, or multi-site management of  vehicle parking providers.

 

The TARV specification recognises that practices and the regulation environment will vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and in some jurisdictions there may be no regulatory involvement whatsoever. 

 

The TARV specification characterises the generic features for such systems, and the generic inputs from and outputs to the regulated vehicle.

 

 

 

12.3.6.5    Reference to European Regulation

 

EU Delegated Regulation No 885/2013 concerning the provision of information services for safe and secure parking places for trucks and commercial vehicles, specifically references the CEN 16157 series of standards (DATEX II) as a means to achieve compliance with the requirement to provide data.

 

Article 4 of the Regulation details the data to be provided as follows:

 

  • Identification information of parking area

  • Location information including road- and direction information, exit to be taken

  • Total number of free parking places for trucks and number of parking places for refrigerated goods vehicles

  • Price and currency of parking places

  • Information on safety and equipment of the parking area

  • Information on specific equipment or services for specific goods vehicles and other

  • Contact information of the parking operator and consent of the operator to make this public

  • Dynamic data on availability of parking places including whether a parking is: full, closed or number of free places which are available.

 

 

 

 

12.3.7    Use Case - Automotive visibility in the distribution supply chain

12.3.7.1    Purpose

 

This functional area establishes a framework and architecture for data collection of the physical movement of vehicles, construction machinery, and agricultural equipment, in the distribution chain between a point of origin (start of logistics movement) and an intended destination, in a complex supply chain landscape with fragmented systems and processes.  This approach and related standards seek to provide consistent data architecture, harmonized data concepts and presentation for such data.

 

12.4.7.2     Stakeholders

 

  • Automotive dealers

  • Automotive distributers

  • Automotive manufacturers

  • Carriers,

  • Customs authorities,

  • Freight carrier

  • Intermodal and terminal operators

  • Logistics organisations - labelling, forwarding, portal handlers

 

 

 

12.3,7.3    System context

 

The automotive distribution supply chain, which includes newly manufactured vehicles, second-hand vehicles, industrial machines, construction machines and agricultural equipment (but particularly that for the supply of newly manufactured vehicles and machines), can be defined as a logistics chain from point of origin to an intended destination. The related parties are many, consisting of automotive manufacturers, dealers, carriers, intermodal and terminal operators, customs authorities, automotive dealers and other logistic related companies such as labelling, forwarding, portal handlers among others, and this complexity makes the distribution chain difficult to control and financially inefficient. Most of the logistics process occurs at land transport and storage parks of new manufactured and used automotive shipping terminals, both prior to international shipping and post international shipping.

 

 

Most distribution supply chain operations that manage the movement of automobiles through the distribution supply chain are currently handled manually, on a company-by-company basis, and generate a very significant amount of paperwork, which is duplicated at each stage throughout the distribution chain, causing duplication of unharmonised data and difficulty in matching these different data concepts associated with a single item in shipment.

 

 

Transport movements are made by international shippers and forwarders, and not on a single company basis. Inconsistent availability and format of data creates problems in the management of the distribution chain.

 

 

The many parties involved in the distribution supply chain, and lack of data or inconsistency in its format and presentation, causes inefficient land transport, and highly labour intensive and complicated operations in terminals, and increases the required minimum stock levels required to assure contingency of supply in order to avoid stock-out situations.

 

 

Further, it is very common for dealers to request changes of finished vehicle options and destination based on final customers request in an actual business environment, this is complex and difficult to achieve without visibility throughout the distribution supply chain.

 

 

Improving the efficiency of the automotive distribution supply chain will make a significant contribution to reducing pollution, reducing waste of finite resources, and reduction of environmental problems.

 

 

Considerable work and effort has already been undertaken to formalise, harmonise and standardise the documentation and the formal business processes associated with the documentation management of the automotive supply chain for finished vehicles, and these processes and data concepts are acknowledged and accepted with regards to the formal documentation processing and management of such systems.  The existing (and standardised) supply chain documentation and data processing are not affected by this International Standard, which is complementary to those processes, and designed mostly for use by logistics operators. However, unlike many items in supply chains, automotives can be, and are, informally physically moved around car parks and holding centres during the logistics of operations.

 

 

As there are many existing practices within the process of automotive fabrication, and very local practices within dealers, it is recognised that these aspects of vehicle build and delivery will have their own domestic architectures; similarly there are established practices and procedures on the maritime leg of the journey. However, if the manufacturer, dealer, shipper or dealer wishes, at their option, to extend this architecture and data definitions into their domains, this architecture enables them to do so, should they so elect to do.

 

 

 

12.3.7.4    Key standards

 

ISO 18495-1:2016 establishes a framework and architecture for data collection of the physical movement of vehicles, construction machinery, and agricultural equipment, in the distribution chain between a point of origin (start of logistics movement) and an intended destination, and provides a means to monitor their actual physical movement at and between various stages of the distribution supply chain, including informal movements within any of these stages/locations, and provides consistent data architecture, harmonized data concepts and presentation for such data.

 

This architecture is designed to cover any undocumented movements at any location. The scope of ISO 18495-1 is to:

 

a) enable dynamic location within a storage area/compound,

b) provide consistent use of the ISO 3779/ ISO 3780 VIN (where available) as the prime identifier, and

c) where a VIN is not available, provide consistent and standardized identification throughout the distribution chain movement.

 

 

 

 

12.3.8   Links to other ITS services

 

As noted above, freight and fleet operations, management and control have many interactions with other functional areas. This most directly affects parking (see section 16), traffic and travel information (see Section 22) and cooperative ITS (see section 9), although most other sections also have connections to freight and fleet management, which are indicated in the relevant text below.

 

 

 

12.3,8.1    Links with traffic and travel information

 

As well provisioning of parking information for freight vehicles Traffic and Traveller Information standard also support a range of other information that can inform freight and fleet services. Perhaps most noticeable is the provision of information services to support navigation, where content of interest to freight operations may be available – such as identified vehicle height, width and weight restrictions.

 

 

 

12.3.8.2    Links with Cooperative ITS

 

Standards supporting connected vehicle services, so-called cooperative ITS (C-ITS), support application of a range of potential information services of particular relevance to freight vehicles. 

 

These include:

 

  • Loading bay reservation, use and monitoring services

  • Eco-driving services – optimum speed advice

  • Signal prioritisation (GLOSSA) and signal green wave services

  • Vehicle platooning

 

See Section 9.

 

 

 

 

12.3.8.3    Electronic Fee Collection/Tolling

 

There are many examples of tolling and road user charging schemes that have a particular focus on freight transport, especially heavy goods vehicles. See section 10 (Electronic Fee Collection).

 

 

 

 

12.3.8.4    Links with Location Referencing and Spatial Data

 

The information services listed above all depend upon the ability to describe the location of controlled zone for freight operations, freight routes, freight-oriented parking options or a specific vehicle in terms that can be readily consumed by receivers of the data.  As such the technical approaches and their supporting Standards tie across to many standards that define spatial data, coordinated systems, data encoding and location referencing, see section 19 (Road Traffic Data, Geographic and Spatial Data).

 

 

 

 

12.3.8.5    Links with Mobility Integration

 

Some of the recent standards emerging from the domain of Integrated Mobility have relevance as supporting capabilities in respect of freight services.  These include:

 

  • CEN/TS 17380:2019 - Intelligent transport systems - Urban-ITS - 'Controlled Zone' management for UVARs using C-ITS (Link), which provides information and specifications enabling management of road traffic in controlled zones applying geofencing. Specifically, this document provides - a "Controlled Zone Data Dictionary" (CZDD) for management of controlled zones providing an extendible toolkit that regulators can use e.g. to inform potential CZ users, e.g. vehicles, about - the CZ area, i.e. the geographical boundaries of the CZ; - CZ access conditions including exempts; - time windows indicating when these CZ access conditions are applicable, allowing the potential CZ users to select an appropriate routing, either by pre-trip planning or ad hoc re-routing, - and illustrations and guidelines on how to use this toolkit.

  • CEN/TS 17378:2019 - Intelligent transport systems - Urban ITS - Air quality management in urban areas (Link), which provides information, guidance and specifications on how to set up an air quality and emissions management policy; to deploy reliable and scalable technologies to monitor air quality on a continuous or regular basis; to react with adequate measures; to specify air quality levels for triggering a scenario;.

 

It also provides a toolkit of parameters and data definitions that a regulator can use; means to measure the air quality required by relevant EU directives; to specify use of TS Intelligent transport systems - Urban-ITS - 'Controlled Zone' management using C-ITS, for the purposes of geofenced controlled zones for emissions management.

 

¾Links with the Exchange of Electronic Traffic Regulation and Kerbside Management - Two emerging areas which are considered to be significant in supporting digital services, automated vehicles, enhanced mobility and optimisation of the urban street scene realm are the exchange of electronic traffic regulations and kerbside management.  Both domains have very strong links to the freight operations and management.

 

Traffic Regulations which are traditionally analogue and in some cases paper-oriented are undergoing a digital revolution – to enable the traffic regulations of the future to be interpreted by machines, reliably robustly and safely exchanged, and evolve to quality levels that are likely to be required for emerging services.  Most on-street parking (including freight loading and unloading) is permitted and controlled via forms of traffic regulations that are typically issued by the relevant local authority. Regimes for payment, monitoring, infringement identification and management and enforcement vary widely. 

 

Standards for the digital exchange of traffic regulations are emerging – but none are published at the time of writing.

See Section 15.

Similarly the ability to clearly share, and digitally control the permitted actions of user at the kerbside (and in the highway in general) is of going interest. This is especially true in larger cities where competing demands and policy objectives are raising innovative approaches to how to manage the kerbside. Again, standards for kerbside management are emerging – but none are published at the time of writing.

See Section 13.

figure 12-3 TARV ADR.PNG

12.4    Supporting infrastructure

12.4.1    Communications

 

Freight and fleet system solutions are deploying across many countries and many physical contexts, as such a wide range of communications technologies are deployed. The communications layer is not special to freight and fleet management, and the more general ITS context is presented in section 8 (communications).

 

Roadside and vehicle mounted equipment are subject to European regulations on EMC. Radiocommunications is governed by spectrum licensing regulations.

 

 

 

12.4.2    Security

 

In a similar manner to communications technologies to support freight operations and management system there are no specific ITS standards that relate to security that apply solely to freight, except for ISO 15638-4, that gives the security requirements for freight regulated vehicles (see Section 12.3.4). 

 

 

 

12.4.3    Automatic Vehicle Identification

 

As part of the content identification and communications domain (see section 12.3.3) there is considerable cross reference to well established standards for automated vehicle identification. In particular, attention is drawn to:

 

  •  ISO 14816:2005 - Road transport and traffic telematics — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Numbering and data structure (Link) and its 2019 Amendment (Link)

 

  • ISO 17261:2012 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Intermodal goods transport architecture and terminology (Link) – which describes the conceptual and logical architecture for automatic vehicle and equipment identification (AVI/AEI) and supporting services in an intermodal/multimodal environment.

 

  • ISO 17262:2012 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Numbering and data structures (Link) – which defines generic numbering and data structures for unambiguous identification of equipment used for Intermodal goods transport. These data are known as "Intermodal Goods Transport Numbering and Data Structures".

 

  • ISO 17263:2012 - Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — System parameters (Link) – which establishes an AEI system based on radio frequency technologies. This system is intended for general application in RTTT/TICS.

 

  • ISO 17264:2009 - Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Interfaces (Link) and its 2019 Amendment (Link)

 

 

See Section 7 (Architecture / AVI)  for further information.

See Section 12.6 for links to regulations

 

 

 

12.5    List of standards

12.5.1    ISO 15638-1:2012 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Framework and architecture (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-1:2012 provides the following for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles:

  1. A framework for the provision of cooperative telematics application services for regulated commercial freight vehicles;

  2. A description of the concept of operation, regulatory aspects and options and the role models;

  3. A conceptual architecture using an on-board platform and wireless communications to a regulator or his agent;

  4. References for the key documents on which the architecture is based;

  5. Details of the architecture of the facilities layer;

  6. A taxonomy of the organisation of generic procedures;

  7. Common terminology for the ISO 15638 family of standards.

ISO 15638-1:2012: is based on a (multiple) service provider oriented approach.

 

 

 

 

12.5.2    ISO 15638-2:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Common platform parameters using CALM (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-2:2013 defines a generic cooperative ITS service platform for TARV using CALM, including protocol of coding, timing, and performance and support interfaces (such as driver ID card/USB or similar etc.).

 

 

 

 

 

12.5.3    ISO 15638-3:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Operating requirements, ‘Approval Authority’ approval procedures, and enforcement provisions for the providers of regulated services  (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-3:2013 defines provisions to enable monitoring and enforcement of regulated vehicles and approval authority approval procedures, specifically:

a) Definition of the roles and responsibilities of key entities: user, service provider, jurisdictions, and 'Approval Authorities'

b) Operating requirements ensuring that a cooperative in-vehicle platform can deliver a range of services to both government and industry through open standards and competitive markets

c) Basic service requirements for service providers that are generic and independent of a specific application

d) Requirements for the approval authority approval of IVSs and service providers

e) Legal, regulatory, and enforcement aspects.

The scope includes the requirements for the IVS capability in the vehicle, and the definition of the roles of the service provider, 'Communications Service Provider', IVS installer, 'IVS maintainer', approval authority, and the user, for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles.

 

 

 

12.5.4    ISO 15638-4:2020 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — System security requirements (Link)

 

Scope:                                                                                          

Security requirements address both hardware and software aspects.

This document addresses the security requirements for:

— the transfer of TARV data from an IVS to an application service provider across a wireless communications interface;

— the receipt of instructions from an application service provider to a TARV IVS;

— the communications aspects of handling of software updates for the IVS over wireless communications.

This document defines the requirements for telematics applications for regulated commercial vehicles for:

a) threat, vulnerability and risk analysis;

b) security services and architecture;

c) identity management;

d) security architecture and management;

e) identity-trust and privacy management;

f) security-access control;

g) security-confidentiality services.

This document provides:

— general specifications for the security of TARV;

— specifications for the security of TARV transactions and data within an ITS-station "bounded secure managed domain" (BSMD);

— specifications for the security of TARV transactions and data transacted with a predetermined address outside of a BSMD.

IVS security requirements are dealt with by the prime service provider and application service provider (See ISO 15638-1).

Application service provision security is dealt with by the application service provider (and could be the subject of a separate TARV standards deliverable).

 

 

12.5.5    ISO 15638-5:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Generic vehicle information (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-5:2013 defines generic basic vehicle and core application data provision to application service providers to be supported by in-vehicle systems (IVS) for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV), and to provide basic vehicle data for cooperative intelligent transport systems.

ISO 15638-5:2013 provides the specifications for generic basic vehicle data that it is required for all TARV IVSs to support and make available to application service providers via a wireless communications link supported by the IVS, in order to support the provision of regulated and commercial application services.

Some further data concepts, while not required in all cases for every TARV in every jurisdiction, may be required generically for all equipment within a particular jurisdiction, or class of TARV within a jurisdiction, in order for the jurisdiction to achieve its regulation of TARVs.

Equipped vehicles operating internationally will need to carry all of the additional data concepts required by all of the jurisdictions within which they operate, in order to determine their core application data. ISO 15638-5:2013 provides standard definitions for these commonly expected additional data concepts.

A second set of (largely complementary) 'basic vehicle' data is required to support interoperable cooperative intelligent transport systems and this is also determined and provided within ISO 15638-5:2013. The framework architecture and many of the protocols are common between both (TARV and C-ITS) sets of requirements, and also with those being adopted by the wider cooperative ITS sector.

 

 

 

12.5.6    ISO 15638-6:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Regulated applications (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-6:2014 specifies the common roles and responsibilities of actors providing regulated application systems which use TARV to provide regulated application services for regulated commercial freight vehicles and the interoperability of key operational steps and actions required to support all TARV regulated application service systems.

ISO 15638-6:2014  specifies the general conditions for data exchanges between an application service provider and vehicle IVS, and from other ITS-stations to the IVS of the regulated commercial freight vehicle, and specifies generic data concepts for identified services, but it does not define the detailed aspects of the application services or their implementation (application specific aspects being defined in ISO 15638-8 to ISO 15638-19 for each identified application service).

ISO 15638-6:2014 addresses the general and common requirements for the provision of regulated application services that require data in addition to, or instead of, basic vehicle data and core application data (application specific aspects being defined in ISO 15638-8 to ISO 15638-19 for each identified application service).

 

ISO 15638-6:2014 provides common aspects of specifications for communications and data exchange aspects of identified application services (as defined in ISO 15638-8 to ISO 15638-19) that a regulator may elect to require or support as an option, including

a) high-level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide [the service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined],

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data common to all parts as defined in ISO 15638-8 to ISO 15638-19, naming content and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

ISO 15638-6:2014 has been developed for use in the context of regulated commercial freight vehicles (hereinafter referred to as regulated vehicles). There is nothing however to prevent a jurisdiction extending or adapting the scope to include other types of regulated vehicles, as it deems appropriate.

 

 

 

 

 

12.5.7    ISO 15638-7:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Other applications (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-7:2013 provides business framework based on a (multiple) service provider oriented approach for the provision of additional unregulated services to regulated commercial freight vehicles using a common on-board telematics platform, including:

a) definition of the service that a 'Service Provider' has to provide, including a given service level (the service definition comprises service elements such as 'retrieve data from IVS', 'map data to a map with access conditions', etc.);

b) means to realise the service;

c) application data, naming content and quality that an IVS has to deliver;

d) development of (any) rules for the approval and auditing of service providers for non-regulated service provision.

 

ISO 15638-7:2013 defines the requirements for the scope and framework for all TARV commercial (unregulated) applications. These applications may then be simply instantiated as commercial applications conforming to the requirements of ISO 15638-7:2013, in which case no further standardization is required, so long as conformance can be demonstrated, and service offerings may vary from service provider to service provider. Where it is decided that there is benefit in standardized instantiation to a common format for a particular service, a separate standards deliverable will be required, but may be developed by the consensus of experts in that area of application by reference to ISO 15638-7:2013 in respect of the TARV technical aspects.

 

 

 

 

 

12.5.8    ISO 15638-8:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 8: Vehicle access management (VAM) (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-8:2014 addresses the provision of "vehicle access management" (and monitoring) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-8:2014 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service vehicle access monitoring that a regulator may elect to require or support as an option, including

a) high level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide, (the service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined),

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content, and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

 

 

 

 

12.5.9    ISO 15638-9:2020 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 9: Remote digital tachograph monitoring (Link)

 

Scope:

This document addresses the provision of 'Remote Digital Tachograph Monitoring' and specifies the form and content of the transmission of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

This document provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service remote digital tachograph monitoring that a jurisdiction regulator can elect to require or support as an option, including:

a) High level definition of the service that a service provider provides. The service definition describes common service elements but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, nor the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined.

b) Means to realize the service.

c) Application data naming, content and quality that an IVS delivers, including a number of profiles for data (noting that requirements and constraints of what can/cannot be transmitted over the air can vary between jurisdictions).

d) Support for a number of defined communication profiles to enable remote inspection.

 

This document is not applicable for analogue tachograph equipment/systems.

 

This document provides specifications for the following communication profiles:

 

— Communication Profile C1: Roadside inspection using a short-range wireless communication interrogator instigating a physical roadside inspection (master<>slave)

Profile C1a: via a hand aimed or temporary roadside mounted and aimed interrogator

Profile C1b: via a vehicle mounted and directed interrogator

Profile C1c: via a permanent or semi-permanent roadside or overhead gantry

 

— Communication Profile C2: Roadside inspection using a short-range wireless communication interrogator instigating a download of data to an application service provider via an ITS-station communication (master<>slave + peer<>peer)

Profile C2a: via a hand aimed or temporary roadside mounted and aimed interrogator

Profile C2b: via a vehicle mounted and directed interrogator

Profile C2c: via a permanent or semi-permanent roadside or overhead gantry

 

— Communication Profile C3: Remote inspection addressed via an ITS-station instigating a download of data to an application service provider via a wireless communications interface (as defined in ISO 15638‑2).

 

It is possible that subsequent versions of this document will support additional communication profiles.

 

 

 

12.5.10    ISO 15638-10:2017 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 10: Emergency messaging system/eCall (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-10:2017 addresses the provision of 'Emergency messaging system/eCall' using the TARV framework, architecture and communications methodology (as defined in ISO 15638‑1 to 6) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-10:2017 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service 'Emergency Messaging System/eCall' that a regulator may elect to require or support as an option, including:

a) High level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide, (The service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined)

b) Means to realise the service

c) Application data, naming content and quality that an IVS  has to deliver.

 

The definition of what comprises a 'regulated' service is regarded as an issue for National decision, and may vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. ISO 15638-10:2017 does not impose any requirements on nations in respect of which services for regulated commercial freight vehicles jurisdictions will require, or support as an option, but provides standardised sets of requirements descriptions for identified services to enable consistent and cost efficient implementations where instantiated.

 

 

 

 

12.5.11    ISO 15638-11:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 11: Driver work records  (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-11:2014 addresses the provision of Driver Work Records (DWR) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-11:2014 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service driver work records that a regulator can elect to require or support as an option, including:

a) high-level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide, [The service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, nor the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined.],

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content, and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

 

 

 

12.5.12    ISO 15638-12:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 12: Vehicle mass monitoring (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-12:2014 addresses the provision of vehicle mass monitoring (VMM) and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-12:2014  provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service VMM that a regulator can elect to require or support as an option, including the following

a) high level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide, (The service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined),

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

 

 

 

12.5.13     ISO 15638-13:2015 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 13: Mass information for jurisdictional control and enforcement (MICE) (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/TS 15638-13:2015 addresses the provision of 'Mass information for jurisdictional control and enforcement' and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems and access methods  to that data.

 

The Scope of this part of ISO 15638 is to provide specifications  for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service  Mass information for jurisdictional control and enforcement that a regulator  may elect to require or support as an option, including

a) high-level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide (the service definition describes common service elements but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined),

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content and quality that an IVS  has to deliver.

 

For clarification, Mass in this context is defined as a mass of a given heavy vehicle as measured by equipment affixed to the regulated vehicle; these mass calculations are achieved by dynamic real-time measurement using equipment especially installed for this purpose to measure the 'mass' impact on the road surface; it is, by definition, a service that can only be available to regulated vehicles that are especially equipped.

 

The definition of what comprises a 'regulated' service is regarded as an issue for National decision, and may vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. This deliverable does not impose any requirements on nations in respect of which services for regulated vehicles jurisdictions will require, or support as an option, but provides standardised sets of requirements descriptions for identified services to enable consistent and cost-efficient implementations where instantiated.

ISO/TS 15638-13:2015 is not a substitute for general electronic fee collection system which, where applied normally need to accord to International EFC Standards in preference to this specification. The Scope of this part of ISO 15638 is limited to the imposition of control and enforcement measures for regulated commercial freight vehicles related to measurement of the Mass  on board the vehicle.

 

 

 

 

12.5.14    ISO 15638-14:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 14: Vehicle access control (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-14:2014 addresses the provision of "vehicle access control" and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-14:2014 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service vehicle access control that a regulator may elect to require or support as an option, including:

a) high-level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide, [The service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined.],

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

 

 

 

12.5.15    ISO 15638-15:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated vehicles (TARV) — Part 15: Vehicle location monitoring (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-15:2014 addresses the provision of vehicle location monitoring and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-15:2014 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service vehicle location monitoring that a regulator may elect to require or support as an option, including:

a) high-level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide,

 

NOTE The service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how

a) such an application service is instantiated, nor the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined.

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content, and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

 

 

 

12.5.16    ISO 15638-16:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 16: Vehicle speed monitoring (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-16:2014 addresses the provision of vehicle speed monitoring and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-16:2014 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service vehicle speed monitoring that a regulator can elect to require or support as an option, including:

a) high level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide (The service definition describes common service elements but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, nor the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined),

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content, and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

 

 

 

12.5.17    ISO 15638-17:2014 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 17: Consignment and location monitoring (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-17:2014 addresses the provision of consignment and location monitoring and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO 15638-17:2014 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service consignment and location monitoring that a regulator can elect to require or support as an option, including

a) high level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide, (The service definition describes common service elements; but does not define

a) the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined),

b) means to realize the service, and

c) application data, naming content, and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

 

 

 

12.5.18    ISO 15638-18:2017 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 18: ADR (Dangerous goods) (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15638-18:2017 addresses the provision of "ADR (dangerous goods)" and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems and access methods to that data.

 

The scope of this document is to provide specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service ADR (dangerous goods) that a regulator may elect to require or support as an option, including

a) high-level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide (the service definition describes common service elements, but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, nor the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined),

 

b) means to realize the service, and

 

c) application data, naming content and quality that an IVS has to deliver.

 

.

 

 

 

 

12.5.19    ISO 15638-19:2013 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 19: Vehicle parking facility (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/TS 15638-19:2013 addresses the provision of 'Vehicle Parking Facility' and specifies the form and content of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

ISO/TS 15638-19:2013 provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service'Vehicle Parking Facility' that a regulator may elect to require or support as an option, including:

a) high level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide (the service definition describes common service elements, but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, not the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined);

b) means to realise the service

c) application data, naming content and quality that an IVS  has to deliver.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

12.5.20    ISO 15638-20:2020 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 20: weigh-in-motion monitoring (Link)

 

Scope:

This document addresses the provision of 'weigh-in-motion monitoring' and specifies the form and content of the transmission of such data required to support such systems, and access methods to that data.

 

This document provides specifications for both on-board weighing (WIM-O) systems and in-road "weigh-in-motion" (WIM-R) systems, and provides a profile where the vehicle weight measured is recorded on-board using equipment already installed for "Remote Tachograph Monitoring".

 

This document provides specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service weigh-in-motion monitoring (WIM-O and WIM-R) that a jurisdiction regulator can elect to require or support as an option, including:

 

a) High level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide (the service definition describes common service elements, but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, nor the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined);

b) Means to realize the service;

c) Application data naming, content and quality that an IVS has to deliver, including a number of profiles for data (noting that requirements and constraints of what can/cannot be transmitted over the air can vary between jurisdictions);

d) Support for a number of defined communication profiles to enable remote inspection.

The present version of this document provides specifications for the following application profiles:

— Application Profile A1: Vehicle weight measurement from "On-Board Weighing" systems (WIM-O);

— Application Profile A2: Vehicle weight measurement from in-road 'weigh-in-motion' systems where data is transferred to the IVS (WIM-R).

 

NOTE 1 Vehicle weight measurement from in-road 'weigh-in-motion' systems where data is linked to a specific vehicle by ANPR or other techniques and sent via landline or cellular communications to a processing centre is also a viable and alternate option, but as it does not

include carrying data on-board the vehicle is not a TARV use case.

The present version of this document provides specifications for the following communication profiles:

 

— Communication Profile 1: Roadside inspection using a short range wireless communication interrogator instigating a physical roadside inspection (master-:-slave):

  • — Profile C1a: via a hand aimed or temporary roadside mounted and aimed interrogator;

  • — Profile C1b: via a vehicle mounted and directed interrogator;

  • — Profile C1c: via a permanent or semi-permanent roadside or overhead gantry.

 

— Communication Profile 2: Roadside inspection using a short range wireless communication interrogator instigating a download of data to an application service provider via an ITS-station communication (master-:-slave + peer-:-peer):

  • — Profile C2a: via a hand aimed or temporary roadside mounted and aimed interrogator;

  • — Profile C2b: via a vehicle mounted and directed interrogator;

  • — Profile C2c: via a permanent or semi-permanent roadside or overhead gantry.

 

— Communication Profile 3: Remote inspection addressed via an ITS-station instigating a download of data to an application service provider via a wireless communications interface (as defined in IISO 15638‑2).

Subsequent versions of this document can support additional communication profiles.

 

 

 

 

12.5.21    ISO 15638-21:2018 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for cooperative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 21: Monitoring of regulated vehicles using roadside sensors and data collected from the vehicle for enforcement and other purposes (Link)

 

Scope:

The ISO 15638 series of standards defines the framework for online fleet management of regulated commercial freight vehicles utilizing data communication between in-vehicle systems and an application service provider via on-board communication unit interfacing with road monitoring infrastructure. This document defines an extension to the existing role model conceptual architecture by adding roadside sensors to the model for additional data collection path for enhancement of the system.

The objective of this document is to reinforce vehicle monitoring for enforcement and other management purposes of regulated commercial freight vehicle movements. The scope of this document is to

a) Reinforce vehicle monitoring for enforcement and other purposes,

b) Provide additional data security by using roadside sensor data links,

c) Detect/avoid tampering/incorrect setting of onboard sensor equipment,

d) Provide means of using roadside sensors to validate the accuracy of on-board equipment, and

e) Enable the combined use of data obtained from the regulated commercial freight vehicle and roadside/in-road sensors to monitor, manage and control the movement of regulated commercial freight vehicles.

 

In this extended role model architecture, roadside sensor (including buried in-road sensors) functionality is added to the existing TARV role model. In this extended role model, jurisdictions and other entities can reinforce monitoring or other management purpose applications by using a combination of information from both in-vehicle systems and roadside/in-road sensors.

 

In this document, the framework for this modified and improved reinforcement of vehicle monitoring for enforcement and other management purpose applications is defined.

 

This document is complementary to, and does not replace, any other parts of the ISO 15638 series of standards. This document is beneficial to jurisdiction enforcement and other vehicle monitoring management purpose entities and it provides a means for using roadside sensors to validate the accuracy of on-board equipment and provides additional use cases for TARV service applications.

 

 

 

 

12.5.22    ISO 15638-22:2019 - Intelligent transport systems — Framework for collaborative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 22: Freight vehicle stability monitoring (Link)

 

Scope:

The ISO 15638 series of standards (Parts 1 to 21) define the framework for online fleet management of regulated commercial freight vehicles utilizing data communication between in-vehicle systems and an application service provider via on-board communication unit interfacing with road monitoring infrastructure and roadside sensors. In this document, an unregulated service architecture frame work for freight vehicle stability monitoring architecture is defined. This statement does not preclude the regulated service where jurisdiction needs such a function.

The objective of this document is to provide a freight vehicle stability monitoring service function/application for non-enforcement applications [and sometimes for regulated application service (RAS)]. This is for road transport safety management purposes of regulated commercial freight vehicle movements. The scope of this document is to

a) Reinforce vehicle stability monitoring for non-enforcement and other purposes by providing safety advisory information provisions to the freight vehicle drivers/operators transporting heavy goods on the freight vehicles.

 

This document defines the framework for remote vehicle stability monitoring for non-enforcement and other management purpose applications conceptual operation.

 

This document is complementary to, and does not replace, any ISO 15638 series standards.

 

This document is beneficial to vehicle monitoring management purpose entities and it provides additional use cases for TARV service applications.

This document is specialized towards the realization of safer road transport of freight vehicles by providing safety advisory information to the vehicle from the service provider and it utilizes ISO 15638 series of standards basic architecture framework defined in ISO 15638-21. The vehicle on-board sensor detected freight vehicle and/or freight container stability data and/or road side sensor data (vehicle stability status detection at roadside) are sent out to the service provider through ITS communication media. The service provider provides users with safety information such as recommended safe speed limit for that particular vehicle and gives speed limit advice messages as necessary. The various V2I communication paths can be used according to the various use cases.

 

 

 

12.5.23    ISO/AWI 15638-23 – Intelligent transport systems — Framework for collaborative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 23: Tyre pressure monitoring

Under development

 

Scope:

This standard addresses the realization of safer road transport of freight vehicles utilizing the existing ISO 15638 standard basic architecture framework. A vehicle on-board sensor and/or an inroad sensor identifies whether a tyre is underinflated or missing and provides this data to a service provider. The service provider advises vehicle operators or commercial vehicle enforcement agencies in order for corrective action to be taken to correct the tyre deficiency. The various V2I communications paths are to be defined in this standard.

 

The scope of this part of ISO 15638 is to provide specifications for common communications and data exchange aspects of the application service “tyre pressure monitoring” (TPM) that a jurisdiction regulator, or operator, may elect to require or support as an option, including:

a)         High level definition of the service that a service provider has to provide, (The service definition describes common service elements; but does not define the detail of how such an application service is instantiated, nor the acceptable value ranges of the data concepts defined)

b)          Means to realise the service

c)      Application data naming, content and quality that an IVS has to deliver, including a number of TPM profiles or data (noting that requirements and constraints of what can/cannot be transmitted over the air may vary between jurisdictions)

d)          Support for a number of defined communication profiles to enable remote inspection.

 

The present version of this International Standard provides specifications for the following application profiles:

 

Application Profile A1 : The cyclical initiation of TPM message by on-board equipment  (TPM-C)

 

Application Profile A2 : The exceptional initiation of TPM message by on-board equipment  (TPM-E)

 

Application Profile A3: The provision of TPM data as the result of an offboard request (TPM-R)

 

Application Profile A4:The provision of TPM data as the result of an offboard reading of tyre pressures of vehicles which may be unequipped (TPM-O)

 

 

 

The present version of this International Standard provides specifications for the following communication profiles:

 

Communication Profile C1: Remote inspection addressed via an ITS-station instigating a download of data to an application service provider via a wireless communications interface (as defined in ISO 15638-2).

 

Communication Profile C2: Remote inspection addressed via a packet switched cellular network (3G LTE, 4G LTE, 5G SRE) instigating a download of data to an application service provider via a wireless communications interface.

 

 

Communication Profile C3:   Roadside inspection using an (EN, ARIB, TTAK compliant) short range wireless communication interrogator to an application service provider via a wireless communications interface (as defined in ISO 15638-2).

Profile C3a:     via a hand aimed or temporary roadside mounted and aimed interrogator

Profile C3b:     via a vehicle mounted and directed interrogator

Profile C3cc:   via a permanent or semi-permanent roadside or overhead gantry

 

Communication Profile C4:   Roadside inspection using an (EN, ARIB, TTAK compliant) short range wireless communication interrogator instigating a physical roadside inspection (master-:-slave)

Profile C3a:     via a hand aimed or temporary roadside mounted and aimed interrogator

Profile C3b:     via a vehicle mounted and directed interrogator

Profile C3cc:   via a permanent or semi-permanent roadside or overhead gantry

 

Communication Profile C5:   Roadside inspection using in-road equipment

 

 

 

Subsequent versions of this International Standard may support additional communication profiles.

 

Systems claiming compliance with this part of ISO 15638 (ISO 15638-23) may support one or multiple application profiles but shall clearly declare which application profiles of this International Standard that they support.(A1 (TPM-C), A2(TPM- E, A3(TPM-R), A4(TPM-O)

Systems claiming compliance with this part of ISO 15638 (ISO 15638-23) may support one or multiple communication profiles but shall clearly declare which communication profiles of this International Standard that they support. (C1, C2, C3 a-c).

 

 

12.5.24    ISO/DIS 15638-24 - Intelligent transport systems — Framework for collaborative telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) — Part 24: Safety information provisioning

Under development

 

Scope: This work item is specialized for safe road transport of freight vehicles by utilizing the 15638 architecture. Vehicle sensor data and/or road side sensor data are sent out to service provider. Service provider provides users the safety information for the vehicle. Various V2X data exchange paths are to be defined. (road sensor data to service provider through OBU or road authorities).

 

 

 

12.5.25    ISO/TS 24533:2012 - Intelligent transport systems — Electronic information exchange to facilitate the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer — Road transport information exchange methodology (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/TS 24533:2012 specifies the data concepts applicable to the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer. These data concepts include information entities (data elements), aggregated/associated information entities (groups of data elements) and messages that comprise information exchanges at transport interfaces along the chain of participants responsible for the delivery of goods from the point of origin through to the final recipient. ISO/TS 24533 focuses on a single "thread" of the overall end-to-end supply chain.

 

 

 

 

12.5.26    ISO/AWI 24533-1 – Intelligent transport systems — Electronic information exchange to facilitate the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer — Part 1: Road transport information exchange methodology

Under development

 

Scope:

This International Standard specifies the data communication concepts applicable to the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer. These data concepts include information entities (data elements), aggregated/associated information entities (groups of data elements) and messages that comprise information exchanges at transport interfaces along the chain of participants responsible for the delivery of goods from the point of origin through to the final recipient. This includes all transport entities carrying the cargo as well as the documents and information required to facilitate the cargo movement. It does not include order or invoice activity, although block chain, later discussed, may have a corollary role. This International Standard focuses on a single "thread" of the overall end-to-end supply chain. It includes motor transport data needs within the international supply chain to satisfy the requirements of both businesses and governmental organizations, on B2B as well as B2G relationships. This International Standard is applicable to shipments that originate in one country and terminate in another. It may also be applied to shipments that originate and terminate in a single country. This International Standard is applicable to freight movements that interface with other modes and incorporates requirements set for those other modes. This International Standard does not constrain the requirements of customs, regulatory, and safety bodies at border crossings but does include the data elements likely to be required by customs authorities and other governmental bodies within a single window environment or within a port community system environment.

 

 

 

 

12.5.27    ISO/CD 24533-2 – Intelligent transport systems — Electronic information exchange to facilitate the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer — Part 2: Common Reporting System

Under development

 

Scope:

This International Standard specifies the data communication concepts applicable to the data requirements of the regulatory authorities related to freight and its intermodal transfer. It builds on the ISO/AWI 24533-1 standard that focuses on road transport information exchange methodology and designed to help implement the transport features of ISO-IEC IS 19845. Information Technology - Universal Business Language Version 2.1 These data concepts include information entities (data elements), aggregated/associated information entities (groups of data elements) and messages that comprise information exchanges at transport interfaces along the chain of participants responsible for the delivery of goods from the point of origin through to the final recipient. This includes all transport entities carrying the cargo as well as the documents and information required to facilitate the cargo movement. This International Standard focuses on a single "thread" of the overall end-to-end supply chain. It includes motor transport data needs within the international supply chain to satisfy the requirements of both businesses and governmental organizations, on B2B, B2G, G2B and G2G relationships. This International Standard is applicable to shipments that originate in one country and terminate in another. It may also be applied to shipments that originate and terminate in a single country. This International Standard is applicable to freight movements that interface with other modes and incorporates requirements set for those other modes. This International Standard does not constrain the requirements of customs, regulatory, and safety bodies at border crossings but does include the data elements likely to be required by customs authorities and other governmental bodies within a single window environment or within a port community system environment. These governmental entities are encouraged to use the methodology included in this standard. It is focused on their needs.

 

 

 

 

12.5.28    ISO 14816:2005 - Road transport and traffic telematics — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Numbering and data structure (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 14816:2005 establishes a common framework data structure for unambiguous identification in RTTT/ITS systems. It excludes any physical aspects such as interfaces. It is neither frequency- nor air interface protocol-specific.

Data elements that form part of transmission or storage protocols such as headers, frame markers and checksums are thus excluded.

The specifications for protecting against changes, classifying and qualifying security aspects of the data structure elements are not included within ISO 14816:2005.

 

The principles of data element structure and description determined in ISO/IEC 8824, ISO/IEC 8825-1 and ISO/IEC 8825-2 have been adopted to provide an interoperable architecture within a standard framework according to guidelines from ISO/TC 204 and CEN/TC 278.

ISO 14816:2005 defines data structures based on the ISO/IEC 8824-1 ASN.1 UNIVERSAL CLASS types that may be directly IMPORTED to other application standards that would need only subsets of the full APPLICATION CLASS types. These UNIVERSAL CLASS and APPLICATION CLASS types are uniquely defined as an ASN.1 module in Annex B. This module may be directly linked into an application data definition.

ISO 14816:2005 defines default encoding for simple AVI/AEI applications where no other relevant application standard exists. This definition forms Clause 4.

 

Note: ISO 14816:2005 was amended in 2019 - ISO 14816:2005/AMD 1:2019 – Road transport and traffic telematics — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Numbering and data structure — Amendment 1 structure (Link)

 

 

 

 

12.5.29    ISO 17261:2012 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Intermodal goods transport architecture and terminology (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17261:2012 describes the conceptual and logical architecture for automatic vehicle and equipment identification (AVI/AEI) and supporting services in an intermodal/multimodal environment.

 

It presents a high level view of AEI intermodal and multimodal system architecture, and describes the key sub systems, their associated interfaces and interactions and how they fit into system wide functions such as management, security and information flow.

 

ISO 17261:2012 identifies the context of intermodal/multimodal AEI within the overall AVI/AEI context and key external inter-dependencies and interfaces to the intermodal/multimodal sector IT infrastructure. These include interfaces to the external and internal users of the intermodal/multimodal system services and their associated IT systems, interfaces to intermodal/multimodal management systems, existing intermodal/multimodal networks and system operations, and specifically interfaces to item identification and the domain of JTC 1/SC 31, item logistics International Standards. As an architecture it is designed to be complementary and interlocking to that domain.

 

ISO 17261:2012 is intended to be complementary and consistent with the work of ISO/TC 104, Freight containers.

It extends the conceptual and communication AVI architecture determined in ISO 14814 and is neither frequency nor air interface protocol specific. It provides maximum interoperability, has a high population capability, and provides the possibility of upwards migration to more capable systems.

 

It does not include the air interface nor any implementation aspect, only the reference architectures. Subsequent International Standards define data structures for general AVI/AEI and for specific sectors of application.

 

 

 

 

12.5.30    ISO 17262:2012 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Numbering and data structures (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17262:2012  defines generic numbering and data structures for unambiguous identification of equipment used for Intermodal goods transport. These data are known as "Intermodal Goods Transport Numbering and Data Structures".

It defines data independently of the data carrier. The modelling of data is based on Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) as defined in ISO/IEC 8824. It excludes any physical aspects such as interfaces, dimensions, etc. Data that form part of transmission or storage protocols (headers, frame markers and checksums) are excluded.

 

Data defined in ISO 17262:2012 require a system for control and distribution of number series independent of the different AVI/AEI systems. This is required in order to avoid ambiguity and to provide the necessary level of security where appropriate. For this reason the registration authority defined in ISO 14816:2005 applies for ISO 17262:2012.

 

ISO 17262:2012 enables the use of optimised encoding schemes such as ASN.1 Packed Encoding Rules (PER).

 

 

 

 

12.5.31    ISO 17263:2012 - Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — System parameters (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17263:2012 establishes an AEI system based on radio frequency technologies. This system is intended for general application in RTTT/TICS (old name for ITS). It allows the transfer of the identification codes and further information about equipment and vehicles used in intermodal transport into such RTTT/TICS and information systems related to intermodal transport processes. Within the intermodal context of the RTTT/TICS Sector, AEI systems have the specific objective of achieving an unambiguous identification of an ITU or related equipment or vehicle or item used in intermodal transport, and to make that identification automatically. Vehicles will be considered and handled under Intermodal aspects as "Intermodal Equipment". Therefore, a differentiation between AEI and AVI systems for the purpose of this standard is not required.

 

 

 

12.5.32    ISO 17264:2009 - Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Interfaces (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17624:2009 provides the specifications of:

  • common AVI/AEI transaction requirements, which define the common steps of any AVI/AEI transaction;

  • AVI/AEI application interface to standardized wireless protocols (referred to as the "Air Interface") supporting the AVI transaction requirements, so as to enable interoperability.

ISO 17624:2009 is an interface standard, adhering to the open systems interconnection (OSI) philosophy (ISO/IEC 7498‑1), and it is as such not concerned with the implementation choices to be realized at either side of the air interface between the "Fixed Equipment" and "OBE".

 

 

 

 

12.5.33    ISO 17264:2009 - Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Interfaces

ISO 17264:2009/AMD 1:2019 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Interfaces — Amendment 1 (Link)

 

 

 

12.5.34    ISO 26683-1:2013 Intelligent transport systems — Freight land conveyance content identification and communication (FLC-CIC) — Part 1: Context, architecture and referenced standards (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 26683-1:2013 provides the context for application interface profiles for the exchange of land transport data using current technologies and existing standards for item identification, package identification, container identification, and international standards and practices regarding freight and its movement.

 

 

12.5.35    ISO 26683-2:2013 Intelligent transport systems — Freight land conveyance content identification and communication (FLC-CIC) — Part 2: Application interface profiles (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 26683-2:2013 provides application interface profiles for land cargo transport data agglomeration and transfer (within the context and architecture described in ISO 26683-1:2013), using one or more of the international standards listed and defined in Annex A of 26683-1.

 

ISO 26683-2:2013 defines a number of application interface profiles for land cargo transport data to provide more land cargo transport visibility by using current technical standards, specifications and technologies related to cargo transport.

 

 

 

12.5.36    ISO 26683-3:2019 – Intelligent transport systems — Freight land conveyance content identification and communication — Part 3: Monitoring cargo condition information during transport (Link)

 

Scope:

This document establishes requirements for transport and condition monitoring of transported consignments such as agri-food and perishable goods, through applications, models, processes, and information bundles. This document applies to both domestic and cross-border transport of transported consignments, and incorporates the methods described in ISO/IEC 19845, ISO/TS 24533 and ISO/TS 17187 which are transport domain specific, as discussed in the Introduction. Specific extensions include additional actors in the model related to, in particular, the agriculture transport sub-domain, with extended specific processes, and additional information items and/or information bundles for consignment conditions.

 

 

 

12.5.37    ISO/TS 17187:2019 - Intelligent transport systems — Electronic information exchange to facilitate the movement of freight and its intermodal transfer — Governance rules to sustain electronic information exchange methods (Link)

 

Scope:

This document provides governance rules to be used for executing an organized process for business entities to connect to one another electronically for the conduct of electronic trade in a secure and open environment through a standardized framework for information exchange. This standardized framework includes processes and process tools to ease connections between trading partners, to provide full visibility, and to reduce the time goods spend in transit. The application of these rules and attendant standards and technology applications are expected to allow business entities to engage their legacy systems without the cost of upgrades.

 

 

 

12.5.38   ISO 18495-1:2016 – Intelligent transport systems — Commercial freight — Automotive visibility in the distribution supply chain — Part 1: Architecture and data definitions (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 18495-1:2016 establishes a framework and architecture for data collection and to provide data definitions for visibility of vehicles, self-propelled construction machinery and agricultural equipment (hereinafter referred to as "automotives" or "automobiles") in the distribution supply chain between a point of origin (start of logistics movement) and an intended destination.

 

This architecture is designed to cover any undocumented movements at any location. The scope of this part of ISO 18495 is to:

a) enable dynamic location within a storage area/compound,

b) provide consistent use of the ISO 3779/ ISO 3780 VIN (where available) as the prime identifier, and

c) where a VIN is not available, provide consistent and standardized identification throughout the distribution chain movement.

 

 

 

12.5.39    ISO 17687:2007 Transport Information and Control Systems (TICS) -- General fleet management and commercial freight operations -- Data dictionary and message sets for electronic identification and monitoring of hazardous materials/dangerous goods transportation (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17687:2007 supports the application of automated identification, monitoring and exchange of emergency response information regarding dangerous goods carried on board road transport vehicles. Such information may include the identification, quantity and current condition (such as pressure and temperature) of such goods, as well as any relevant emergency response information. When equipped with appropriate electronics and communications capabilities, vehicles carrying dangerous goods may respond to queries regarding their status or self-initiate a message.

 

The information defined here, electronically carried on-board the road transport vehicle, may be transferred to interested roadside systems by whatever communications means are appropriate to that roadside system.

 

The primary intent of ISO 17687:2007 is not trade, economic, or commercial, but to help save lives by facilitating emergency response. ISO 17687:2007 supports local on-site needs in the same manner as conventional visual placards do but with an optional, complementary, enhanced and more versatile electronic version.

 

 

 

12.5.40     ISO 18682:2016 – Intelligent transport systems — External hazard detection and notification systems — Basic requirements (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 18682:2016 specifies basic requirements for systems to execute notifications such as warning and awareness messages to provide hazard information to a driver.

 

Requirements include principle of notifying, timing of notification, distance of notification, and information elements that should be included in messages.

 

NOTE 1 Methods of implementing functions such as hazardous conditions detection, communication, and presentation to drivers are not specified in this document.

 

NOTE 2 The formulae in Clause 5 and calculated concrete time or distance duration in Annex A are not normative elements but informative elements.

 
 
 
 
 

12.5.41    ISO 24534-1:2010 - Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Electronic registration identification (ERI) for vehicles — Part 1: Architecture (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 24534-1:2010 provides requirements for electronic registration identification (ERI) that are based on an identifier assigned to a vehicle (e.g. for recognition by national authorities), suitable to be used for:

  • electronic identification of local and foreign vehicles by national authorities;

  • vehicle manufacturing, in-life maintenance and end-of-life identification (vehicle life cycle management);

  • adaptation of vehicle data (e.g. for international resales);

  • safety-related purposes;

  • crime reduction;

  • commercial services.

 

It adheres to privacy and data protection regulations.

 

ISO 24534-1:2010 provides an overview of the ERI system concept, in terms of the onboard vehicle components and the external off-vehicle components required for an operational system. The detailed requirements are defined in Parts 2, 3, 4 and 5 of ISO 24534 and more limited, though relevant, provisions are defined in ISO 24535.

 

 

 

 

12.5.42     ISO 24534-2:2010 – Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Electronic registration identification (ERI) for vehicles — Part 2: Operational requirements (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 24534-2:2010 provides requirements for electronic registration identification (ERI) that are based on an identifier assigned to a vehicle (e.g. for recognition by national authorities) suitable to be used for:

  • electronic identification of local and foreign vehicles by national authorities;

  • vehicle manufacturing, in-life maintenance and end-of-life identification (vehicle life cycle management);

  • adaptation of vehicle data (e.g. for international resales);

  • safety-related purposes;

  • crime reduction;

  • commercial services.

 

It adheres to privacy and data protection regulations.

 

ISO 24534-2:2010 defines the operational requirements for the remaining parts of ISO 24534 and the more limited but relevant provisions of ISO 24535.

 

Whilst the definition of the organizational framework required to implement, operate and maintain an ERI system is outside the scope of ISO 24534-2:2010, a list of potential stakeholders in the public and private sector has been included.

 

 

 

 

12.5.43    ISO 24534-3:2016 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Electronic registration identification (ERI) for vehicles — Part 3: Vehicle data (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 24534-3:2016 provides the requirements for an electronic registration identification (ERI) that is based on an identifier assigned to a vehicle (e.g. for recognition by national authorities) suitable to be used for the following:

- electronic identification of local and foreign vehicles by national authorities;

- vehicle manufacturing, in-life-maintenance, and end-of-life identification (vehicle life cycle management);

- adaptation of vehicle data, e.g. in case of international re-sales;

- safety-related purposes;

- crime reduction;

- commercial services;

- adhering to privacy and data protection regulations.

 

ISO 24534-3:2016 defines the vehicle identification data. This data is called the ERI data and includes the following:

- the vehicle identifier;

- possible additional vehicle-related information (as typically included in a vehicle registration certificate).

 

All additional vehicle data elements are defined as optional. It is left to local legislation and/or the discretion of a registration authority to use or not to use a particular data element. If used, the value is assumed to be the one registered by the registration authority in accordance with local legislation. This part of ISO 24534 (ISO 24534-3:2016) only provides the syntax for all these data elements.

 

NOTE The secure application layer interfaces for the exchange of ERI data with an ERI reader or writer are specified in ISO 24534‑4 and in ISO 24535.

 

 

 

 

12.5.44    ISO 24534-4:2010 – Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Electronic registration identification (ERI) for vehicles — Part 4: Secure communications using asymmetrical techniques (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 24534-4:2010 provides requirements for electronic registration identification (ERI) that are based on an identifier assigned to a vehicle (e.g. for recognition by national authorities) suitable to be used for:

  • electronic identification of local and foreign vehicles by national authorities;

  • vehicle manufacturing, in-life maintenance and end-of-life identification (vehicle life cycle management);

  • adaptation of vehicle data (e.g. for international resales);

  • safety-related purposes;

  • crime reduction;

  • commercial services.

 

It adheres to privacy and data protection regulations.

 

ISO 24534-4:2010 specifies the interfaces for a secure exchange of data between an ERT and an ERI reader or ERI writer in or outside the vehicle using asymmetric encryption techniques.

 

ISO 24534-4:2010 includes:

  • the application layer interface between an ERT and an onboard ERI reader or writer;

  • the application layer interface between the onboard ERI equipment and external ERI readers and writers;

  • security issues related to the communication with the ERT.

 

 

12.5.45    ISO 24534-5:2011 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle and equipment identification — Electronic Registration Identification (ERI) for vehicles — Part 5: Secure communications using symmetrical techniques (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 24534 provides the requirements for an electronic registration identification (ERI) using symmetric encryption techniques that are based on an identifier assigned to a vehicle (e.g. for recognition by national authorities) suitable to be used for

  • electronic identification of local and foreign vehicles by national authorities,

  • vehicle manufacturing, in-life maintenance and end-of-life identification (vehicle life-cycle management),

  • adaptation of vehicle data, e.g. in case of international re-sales,

  • safety related purposes,

  • crime reduction,

  • commercial services, and

  • adhering to privacy and data protection regulations.

 

ISO 24534-5:2011 specifies the interfaces for a secure exchange of data between the electronic registration tag (ERT), which is the onboard device containing the ERI data, and the ERI reader or ERI writer in or outside the vehicle using symmetric encryption techniques.

Symmetric encryption techniques are based on secret keys shared by a particular community of users, i.e. in closed user groups in which it is trusted that keys are not revealed to outsiders.

 

It includes

  • the interface between an ERT and an onboard ERI reader or writer,

  • the interface between the onboard ERI equipment and (roadside) reading and writing equipment, and

  • security issues related to the communication with the ERT.

 

 

 

 

12.5.46    ISO 24535:2007 – Intelligent transport systems — Automatic vehicle identification — Basic electronic registration identification (Basic ERI) (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 24535:2007 supports simple systems for "basic electronic registration identification" ("basic ERI") for use in intelligent road transport applications.

 

ISO 24535:2007 "basic ERI" defines the: specification of a unique vehicle identifier (using an International Standard, or non-standard, data concept); "basic ERI" functional capabilities, selectable for different "basic ERI" applications; and minimum data interoperability requirements between basic electronic registration tags (ERTs) and electronic registration readers (ERRs).

ISO 24535:2007 allows, but does not require, vehicle-related data storage in addition to the unique vehicle identifier.

 

ISO 24535:2007 is consistent with the ERI architecture defined in ISO 24534-1:2010 and data concepts defined in ISO 24534-3:2016, but is not necessarily interoperable with, the more capable and "fully featured" ERI communication systems to be defined in ISO 24534-4:2010 or ISO 24534-5:2011.

 

ISO 24535:2007 defines a "basic ERI" system with security adequate for information that is currently available manually (such as license plate and/or VIN data), but it does not purport to provide the high levels of security required for some administrative requirements. Those requiring high security are advised to follow the relevant parts of ISO 24534.

 

Although not part of ISO 24535:2007, the employed technologies supporting ISO 24535:2007 may enable additional non-standard security measures to be added for specific applications

 

It is not the purpose of ISO 24535:2007 to define "basic ERI" applications.

 

ISO 24535:2007 requires the use of an air interface communication that complies with an international or regional standard whose protocols are publicly defined and available in that standard, but ISO 24535:2007does not define such an air interface, nor specify which standard air interface is used for any particular implementation.

 

ISO 24535:2007limits its scope to: the requirement that a standard air interface with publicly available protocols is used; the use of data concepts consistent with (ISO 24534-3:2016); and the ability to additionally use private data concepts.

 

 

 

12.5.47    ISO 668:2020 – Series 1 freight containers — Classification, dimensions and ratings (Link)

 

Scope:

This document establishes a classification of series 1 freight containers based on external dimensions, and specifies the associated ratings and, where appropriate, the minimum internal and door opening dimensions for certain types of containers.

These containers are intended for intercontinental traffic.

 

This document summarizes the external and some of the internal dimensions of series 1 containers. The dimensions of each type of container are defined in the appropriate part of ISO 1496, which is the authoritative document for internal container dimensions.

 

 

12.5.48    ISO 10374 - Freight Containers — Automatic Identification

 

Scope

This International Standard establishes

a) a container identification system which allows the transfer of information from a freight container to an automatic processing system by electronic means,

b) a data coding system for container identification and permanent related information which resides within an electronic device called a tag installed on a freight container,

c) a data coding system for the electronic transfer of both container identification and permanent related information from an electronic device installed on a freight container to automatic data processing systems,

d) the description of the data to be included in the tag for transmission to the sensing equipment,

e) performance criteria necessary to ensure consistent and reliable operation of the automatic equipment identification (AEI) system within the international transportation community,

f) requirements for the physical location of the electronic device on freight containers, and

g) security features to inhibit malicious or unintentional alteration of the information content of the electronic device when installed on a freight container.

 

It specifies all necessary user requirements in order to permit international use of the tag without modification or adjustment.

 

This International Standard applies to freight containers as defined in ISO 668:2020.

 

The use of AEI systems and the equipping of containers for automatic identification is not mandatory. The purpose of this International Standard is to optimize the efficiency of equipment control systems.

 

For this reason, any AEI system used for identifying containers shall conform to and be compatible with this International Standard.

 

 

 

12.5.49    ISO 7372:2005 – Trade data interchange — Trade data elements directory (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 7372:2005 lists standard data elements intended to facilitate open interchange of data in international trade.

The standard data elements listed can be used with any method for data interchange on paper documents as well as with other means of data processing and communication.

 

 

 

12.5.50    CEN/TS 16157-6:2015: Intelligent transport systems - DATEX II data exchange specifications for traffic management and information - Part 6: Parking publications  (Link)

 

Scope:

The sixth part of the DATEX II Technical Specifications which deals with a DATEX II Level B extension (two publications and a Truck Parking profile) that supports the exchange of static as well as dynamic information about parking facilities and areas, including intelligent truck parking as defined by the Directive 2010/40/EU priority actions e and f. The publications are intended to support the exchange of informational content from the organisation performing measurements and collecting/eliciting basic data to other organisations providing ITS services or onward information exchange. It is the ambition to harmonise existing information models from different sources such as EasyWay deployment guidelines, In-Time CAI and Truck Parking initiatives, and to liaise with the stakeholders involved.

 

 

 

 

12.5.51    ISO 21217:2020 – Intelligent transport systems — Communications access for land mobiles (CALM) — Architecture (Link)

 

Scope:

This document describes the communications reference architecture of nodes called “ITS station units” designed for deployment in intelligent transport systems (ITS) communication networks. The ITS station reference architecture is described in an abstract manner. While this document describes a number of ITS station elements, whether or not a particular element is implemented in an ITS station unit depends on the specific communication requirements of the implementation.

This document also describes the various communication modes for peer-to-peer communications over various networks between ITS communication nodes. These nodes can be ITS station units as described in this document or any other reachable nodes.

 

This document specifies the minimum set of normative requirements for a physical instantiation of the ITS station based on the principles of a bounded secured managed domain.

12.5.52     ISO/IEC 15418:2016 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — GS1 Application Identifiers and ASC MH10 Data Identifiers and maintenance (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/IEC 15418:2016

- specifies sets of Data Identifiers and Application Identifiers for the purpose of identifying encoded data, and

- identifies the organizations responsible for their maintenance.

 

 

 

12.5.53    ISO/IEC 15420:2009 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — EAN/UPC bar code symbology specification (Link)

 

Scope:

Manufacturers of bar code equipment and users of bar code technology require publicly available standard symbology specifications to which they can refer when developing equipment and software.

 

ISO/IEC 15420:2009 specifies the requirements for the bar code symbology known as EAN/UPC. It specifies EAN/UPC symbology characteristics, data character encodation, dimensions, tolerances, decoding algorithms and parameters to be defined by applications. It specifies the Symbology Identifier prefix strings for EAN/UPC symbols.

 

Data content and the rules governing the use of this symbology are outside the scope of ISO/IEC 15420:2009; they are defined in the GS1 General Specifications.

 

 

 

 

12.5.54    ISO 15394:2017 – Packaging — Bar code and two-dimensional symbols for shipping, transport and receiving labels (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 15394:2017:

- specifies the minimum requirements for the design of labels containing linear bar code and two-dimensional symbols on transport units to convey data between trading partners;

- provides for traceability of transported units using a unique transport unit identifier (licence plate);

- provides guidance on the formatting on the label of data presented in linear bar code, two-dimensional symbol or human-readable form;

- provides specific recommendations regarding the choice of bar code symbologies, and specifies quality requirements;

- provides recommendations as to label placement, size and the inclusion of free text and any appropriate graphics;

- provides guidance on the selection of the label material.

 

This document is not applicable to the direct printing on to kraft coloured corrugated surfaces.

 

NOTE Guidance on the direct printing of bar code symbols on to kraft coloured corrugated surfaces are provided in references such as The Fibre Box Handbook.

(link to Fibre Box Association - Representing and serving the corrugated industry)

 

 

12.5.55     ISO/IEC 15424:2008 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — Data Carrier Identifiers (including Symbology Identifiers) (Link)

 

Scope:

The need exists to identify the data carrier a reader detects in autodiscrimination environments. The Symbology Identifier concept provides a standardized way for a device receiving data from a reader to differentiate between the data carriers. ISO/IEC 15424:2008deals mostly with bar code symbologies; the terms Symbology Identifier, symbology, and bar code are therefore used throughout ISO/IEC 15424:2008 although they are intended to apply to other data carriers as well.

This identification is achieved by the addition of an optional feature to readers enabling the reader to prefix a standard string of characters to data messages. This preamble contains information about the decoded symbol (or other data carrier) and any processing the reader has done. The information is not encoded or otherwise explicitly or implicitly represented in the symbol, except that the presence of some optional features may be detected by the reading equipment, whereas others require the reader to be expressly configured to implement them.

ISO/IEC 15424:2008 should be read in conjunction with the relevant symbology specifications.

ISO/IEC 15424:2008 applies to automatic identification device communication conventions and standardizes the reporting of data carriers from bar code readers and other automatic identification equipment. It specifies a preamble message generated by the reader and interpretable by the receiving system, which indicates the bar code symbology or other origin of transmitted data, together with details of certain specified optional processing features associated with the data message.

 

 

 

 

12.5.56   ISO/IEC 15438:2015 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — PDF417 bar code symbology specification (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/IEC 15438:2015 specifies the requirements for the bar code symbology known as PDF417. It specifies PDF417 symbology characteristics, data character encodation, symbol formats, dimensions, error correction rules, reference decoding algorithm, and a number of application parameters.

 

 

 

12.5.57    ISO/IEC 15459-1:2014 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — Unique identification — Part 1: Individual transport units  (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/IEC 15459-1:2014 specifies a unique string of characters for the identification of individual transport units. The character string is intended to be represented in a bar code label or other AIDC media attached to the entity to meet management needs. To address management needs, different types of entities are recognized in the various parts of ISO/IEC 15459, which allows different requirements to be met by the identities associated with each type.

The rules for the unique identification for individual transport units, to identify physical logistical transfers, with the identity relevant for the duration of one or more items in the load being held or transported as part of that load, are defined and supported by example.

 

 

 

12.5.58    ISO/IEC 15459-4:2014 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — Unique identification — Part 4: Individual products and product packages (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/IEC 15459-4:2014 specifies a unique string of characters for the identification of individual products and product packages. The character string is intended to be represented in a linear bar code symbol or two-dimensional symbol or other automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) media attached to the entity to meet management needs. To address management needs, different classes of identities are recognized in the various parts of ISO/IEC 15459, which allows different requirements to be met by the identities associated with each class.

 

The rules for the identification of an individual occurrence of a product or product package, understood to mean the layers zero and one defined in ISO 17367 and ISO 17366, respectively, are defined and supported by examples.

 

 

 

 

12.5.59    ISO/IEC 15459-5:2014 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — Unique identification — Part 5: Individual returnable transport items (RTIs) (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/IEC 15459-5:2014 specifies a unique string of characters for the identification of individual returnable transport items (RTIs). The character string is intended to be represented in a bar code label or other automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) media attached to the item to meet management needs. To address management needs, different classes of identities are recognized in the various parts of ISO/IEC 15459, which allows different requirements to be met by the identities associated with each class.

 

The rules for the identification of RTIs, with the identity being relevant for the complete lifecycle of the item, are defined and supported by example.

 

 

 

12.5.60    ISO/IEC 15961-1:2013 – Information technology — Radio frequency identification (RFID) for item management: Data protocol — Part 1: Application interface (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/IEC 15961-1:2013 focuses on the abstract interface between an application and the data processor, and includes the specification and definition of application commands and responses.

 

It allows data and commands to be specified in a standardized way, independent of the particular air interface of ISO/IEC 18000.

 

SO/IEC 15961-1:2013

  • provides guidelines on how data shall be presented as objects;

  • defines the structure of Object Identifiers, based on ISO/IEC 9834-1;

  • specifies the commands that are supported for transferring data between an application and the radio frequency identification (RFID) tag;

  • specifies the responses that are supported for transferring data between the RFID tag and the application;

  • does not specify any required transfer syntax with ISO/IEC 15962, but provides the non-normative information to provide backward compatibility with ISO/IEC 15961:2004.

 

Note: this is a 4 Part series.

 

 

 

12.5.61    ISO/IEC 15962 :2013 – Information technology — Radio frequency identification (RFID) for item management — Data protocol: data encoding rules and logical memory functions (Link)

 

Scope:

The data protocol used to exchange information in a radio frequency identification (RFID) system for item management is specified in ISO/IEC 15961-1:2013

and in ISO/IEC 15962:2013. Both International Standards are required for a complete understanding of the data protocol in its entirety; but each focuses on one particular interface:

  • ISO/IEC 15961-1:2013 addresses the interface with the application system.

  • ISO/IEC 15962:2013. deals with the processing of data and its presentation to the RF tag, and the initial processing of data captured from the RF tag.

 

ISO/IEC 15962:2013. focuses on encoding the transfer syntax, as defined in ISO/IEC 15961-1:2013 according to the application commands defined in ISO/IEC 15961-1:2013. The encodation is in a Logical Memory as a software analogue of the physical memory of the RFID tag being addressed by the interrogator.

 

ISO/IEC 15962:2013.

  • defines the encoded structure of object identifiers;

  • specifies the data compaction rules that apply to the encoded data;

  • specifies a Precursor for encoding syntax features efficiently;

  • specifies formatting rules for the data, e.g. depending on whether a directory is used or not;

  • defines how application commands, e.g. to lock data, are transferred to the Tag Driver;

  • specifies processes associated with sensory information and the transfers to the Tag Driver;

  • defines other communication to the application.

 

 

12.5.62    ISO/IEC 16022:2006 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — Data Matrix bar code symbology specification (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO/IEC 16022:2006 defines the requirements for the symbology known as Data Matrix. It specifies the Data Matrix symbology characteristics, data character encodation, symbol formats, dimensions and print quality requirements, error correction rules, decoding algorithm, and user-selectable application parameters.

 

It applies to all Data Matrix symbols produced by any printing or marking technology.

 

Data Matrix is a two-dimensional matrix symbology which is made up of nominally square modules arranged within a perimeter finder pattern. Though primarily shown and described in ISO/IEC 16022:2006 as a dark symbol on light background, Data Matrix symbols can also be printed to appear as light on dark.

 

Manufacturers of bar code equipment and users of the technology require publicly available standard symbology specifications to which they can refer when developing equipment and application standards. The publication of standardized symbology specifications is designed to achieve this.

 

 

 

12.5.63    ISO/IEC 16023:2000 - Information technology — International symbology specification — MaxiCode (Link)

 

Scope:

This specification defines the requirements for the symbology known as MaxiCode.  MaxiCode is a fixed-size matrix symbology which is made up of offset rows of hexagonal modules arranged around a unique finder pattern.  This specification specifies the MaxiCode symbology characteristics, data character encodation, symbol formats, dimensions and print quality requirements, error correction rules, decoding algorithm, and user-selectable application parameters.  MaxiCode includes special encodation modes for use in destination sortation symbols by carriers in the transport industry.

 

 

 

12.5.64    ISO/IEC 16388:2007 – Information technology — Automatic identification and data capture techniques — Code 39 bar code symbology specification (Link)

 

Scope:

The technology of bar coding is based on the recognition of patterns encoded in bars and spaces of defined dimensions. There are numerous methods of encoding information in bar code form, known as symbologies. Code 39 is one such symbology. The rules defining the translation of characters into bar and space patterns and other essential features are known as the symbology specification.

In the past, symbology specifications were developed and published by a number of organizations, resulting in certain instances in conflicting requirements for certain symbologies.

 

Manufacturers of bar code equipment and users of bar code technology require publicly available standard symbology specifications to which they can refer when developing equipment and application standards.

 

ISO/IEC 16388:2007 specifies the requirements for the bar code symbology known as Code 39; it specifies Code 39 symbology characteristics, data character encodation, dimensions, tolerances, decoding algorithms and parameters to be defined by applications. It specifies the Symbology Identifier prefix strings for Code 39 symbols.

 

 

12.5.65    EN 16405:2022 - Intelligent transport systems - Ecall - Additional data concept specification for heavy goods vehicles (Link)

 

Scope:

This Technical Specification defines an additional data concept that may be transferred as an ‘optional additional data concept’ as defined in EN 15722 eCall MSD, that may be transferred from a goods vehicle to a PSAP in the event of a crash or emergency via an eCall communication session. Two variants are provided, one (schema A) for use where information about the goods (ADR classified or not) is known in the eCall device; the second variant (schema B) is for use where such information shall be fetched from elsewhere. This Technical Specification should be seen as an addendum to EN 15722; it contains as little redundancy as possible. The communications media protocols and methods for the transmission of the eCall message are not specified in this Technical Specification. Additional data concepts may also be transferred, and any such data concepts should be registered using a data registry as defined in EN ISO 24978. See www.esafetydata.com for an example.

 

12.5.66    CEN TS 17642 Intelligent Transport Systems - eSafety - eCall Interface for PSAPs to access cargo and dangerous goods databases (Link)

 

Scope:

Within the context of 112-eCall (operating requirements defined in EN 16072), this document defines specifications for the provision of 112-eCall for regulated commercial vehicles, including rigid body trucks and variants thereof, prime mover and trailer combinations (sometimes called “semi’s”, road trains [one prime mover with multiple trailers]) and other regulated commercial vehicles (for example vans carrying medical supplies or radioactive material).

The work of EN 16405 is adopted and extended in this document. (A revised version of EN 16405 will remain the principal reference document for the content and definition of the commercial vehicle optional additional data set). As with the existing provisions for 112-eCall for Category M1/N1 vehicles, these are specified within the paradigm of being OEM fit equipment supplied with new vehicles.

The scope of this specification is limited to the provision of eCall from a commercial vehicle prime mover /rigid body truck ) designed for conveying cargo. (UNECE Category N). This document specifies the requirements for the use of 112-eCall by a commercial vehicle prime mover /rigid body truck and defines the interface between the PSAPs and an external transport database. Unless superseded by European Regulation at some future date, all data schemas specified herein and defined in a revision of EN 16405 are “Optional Additional Data” (OAD) concepts, as enabled in accordance with EN 15722 as part of the minimum set of data As OAD they, and the elements within them, are, by definition, “optional” with use at the discretion of the operator of the vehicle.

This document defines how eCall for commercial vehicles is expected to interact with the future eFTI  standards and the prerequisites for these standards to allow the access to the relevant freight information for the PSAPSs in case of an eCall.

NOTE 1 The provision of eCall from IVS located within trailers is not included in this document, but could be the subject of a further standards deliverable.

NOTE 2 The provision of eCall for vehicles via the aftermarket (post sale and registration) will be the subject of other work, and in respect of the operational requirements for any such aftermarket solutions for commercial vehicles, will use this document as a principle reference point.

NOTE 3 The 112-eCall paradigm involves a direct call from the vehicle to the most appropriate PSAP (Third party service provision by comparison, involves the support of an intermediary third party service provider before the call is forwarded to the PSAP). The specifications herein relate only to the provision of 112-eCall or IMS-112-eCall, and do not provide specifications for third party service provision of eCall, although in the case of 112-eCall for commercial vehicles, links to third party provision of service aspects (such as cargo contents) could be required.

12.5.67   CEN TS 17249-2 Intelligent transport systems — eSafety — eCall for HGVs and other commercial vehicles 

 

Scope:

The Scope of this document is limited to the provision of eCall from a commercial vehicle prime mover /rigid body truck designed for conveying cargo (UNECE Category N).

Within the context of 112-eCall (operating requirements defined in EN 16072), this document defines specifications for the provision of 112-eCall for regulated commercial vehicles, including rigid body trucks and variants thereof, prime mover and trailer combinations (sometimes called “semi’s”, road trains [one prime mover with multiple trailers]) and other regulated commercial vehicles (for example vans carrying medical supplies or radioactive material).

As with the existing provisions for 112-eCall for Category M1/N1 vehicles, these are specified within the paradigm of being OEM fit equipment supplied with new vehicles.

The work of EN 16405 is adopted and extended in this document. (A revised edition of EN 16405(:2018) will remain the principal reference document for the content and definition of the commercial vehicle optional additional data set.)

This document specifies the requirements for the use of 112-eCall by a commercial vehicle prime mover /rigid body truck and determines circumstances where it is appropriate to additionally provide new optional additional data as determined in EN 16405(:2018 or later) as Schema C for use in a packet switched environment which is not constrained by the 140 byte limit.

Unless superseded by European Regulation on some future date, all data schemas specified in EN 16405 are “Optional Additional Data” (OAD) concepts, as enabled in accordance with EN 15722 as part of the minimum set of data. As OAD they, and the elements within them, are, by definition, “optional” with use at the discretion of the operator of the vehicle.

 

12.5.68    ISO 17363:2013 – Supply chain applications of RFID — Freight containers (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17363:2013 defines the usage of read/write radio-frequency identification technology (RFID) cargo shipment-specific tags associated with containerized freight for supply chain management purposes ("manifest tags"). ISO 17363:2013 defines the air interface communications, a common set of required data structures, and a commonly organized, through common syntax and semantics, set of optional data requirements.

ISO 17363:2013:

a) makes recommendations about a second generation supply chain tag intended to monitor the condition and security of the freight resident within a freight container;

b) specifies the implementation of sensors for freight resident in a freight container;

c) makes specific recommendations about mandatory non-reprogrammable information on the shipment tag;

d) makes specific recommendations about optional, re-programmable information on the shipment tag;

e) makes specific recommendations about the data link interface for GPS or GLS services;

f) specifies the reuse and recyclability of the RF tag;

g) specifies the means by which the data in a compliant RF tag is "backed-up" by bar codes and two-dimensional symbols, as well as human-readable information.

12.5.69     ISO 17364:2013 – Supply chain applications of RFID — Returnable transport items (RTIs) and returnable packaging items (RPIs) (Link)

 

Scope:

This International Standard defines the basic features of RFID for use in the supply chain when applied to returnable transport items (RTIs). In particular it

— provides specifications for the identification of the RTI and the returnable packaging item (RPI),

— makes recommendations about additional information on the RF tag,

— specifies the semantics and data syntax to be used,

— specifies the data protocol to be used to interface with business applications and the RFID system,

— specifies the minimum performance requirements,

— specifies the air interface standards between the RF interrogator and RF tag, and

— specifies the reuse and recyclability of the RF tag.

 

 

 

12.5.70    ISO 17365:2013 – Supply chain applications of RFID — Transport units (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17365:2013 defines the basic features of RFID for use in the supply chain when applied to transport units. In particular it

a) provides specifications for the identification of the transport unit,

b) makes recommendations about additional information on the RF tag,

c) specifies the semantics and data syntax to be used,

d) specifies the data protocol to be used to interface with business applications and the RFID system,

e) specifies the minimum performance requirements,

f) specifies the air interface standards between the RF interrogator and RF tag, and

g) specifies the reuse and recyclability of the RF tag.

 

 

 

12.5.72    ISO 17366:2013 – Supply chain applications of RFID — Product packaging (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17366:2013 defines the basic features of RFID for use in the supply chain when applied to product packaging. In particular it

a) provides specifications for the identification of the product packaging,

b) makes recommendations about additional information on the RF tag,

c) specifies the semantics and data syntax to be used,

d) specifies the data protocol to be used to interface with business applications and the RFID system,

e) specifies the minimum performance requirements,

f) specifies the air interface standards between the RF interrogator and RF tag, and

g) specifies the reuse and recyclability of the RF tag.

 

 

 

12.5.73   ISO 17367:2013 – Supply chain applications of RFID — Product tagging (Link)

 

Scope:

ISO 17367:2013 defines the basic features of RFID for use in the supply chain when applied to product tagging. In particular it:

a) provides specific reco